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Page 304

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA

us to stop to tea. Tea there was always delicious-peas done in butter were served with it, as were tangerines, as were guavas, sliced and peppered, and sometimes his married friends had sent sweets. But he could not well press us-the suppliant's table manners were too awful-nor could he come to tea with us, not liking to leave his brother alone, nor could they both come' fearing to leave the house. Our depression increased when we caught sight of the old man himself. A thousand insults (I was told) were implied in his salaam. And from inquiries in the bazaar we had news that he really was a bad lot. Nothing could be done, for Obaidulla, though humorous and gentle, allowed no interference with his hospitality. We could only wonder for how long he would sacrifice his friends, his liberty, and his career, and reflect on the disadvantages of keeping house in the medixval style.
Next morning the suppliant called on us. We repelled him before he could speak, and soon afterwards Obaidulla tumbled up on his bicycle, radiant with joy. ` A most fortunate thing has happened,' he cried. ' He has stolen one rupee four annas six pies from my servant's clothes and gone.'
We congratulated him, and asked for details.
` Ah ! ah ! at last we are happy again. Now I can tell you. When the little boy caught him I did not know what to do. One cannot be impolite. I said : " There seems to have been some misunderstanding," and I waited. Very luckily he grew warm. He said: " I never stop in a house where I am not trusted." I answered :" I am sorry to hear you say such a thing, and I have never said I do not trust you."-" No, but your servants. Enough ! Enough ! I am your clerk no longer. I go." I told him I was sorry to hear his decision, but perhaps he was wise. So he came straight round to you, having got all he could out of us ! Oh, the old villain !'I'he monster ! It is a disgrace to India that such men exist ! However, it cannot be helped, I suppose.'
'And the money ? '
` Oh, he took it, of course ; of course. But I might have had to replace as much as fifty rupees. Well, that is all over, and to-day will you both come to tea ?'
He was really too silly, and we gave him a good British talking.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE us to stop to tea. Tea there was always delicious-peas done in butter were served with it, as were tangerines, as were guavas, sliced and peppered, and sometimes his married friends had sent sweets. But he could not well press us-the suppliant's table manners were too awful-nor could he come to tea with us, not liking to leave his brother alone, nor could they both come' fearing to leave what is house. Our depression increased when we caught sight of what is old man himself. A thousand insults (I was told) were implied in his salaam. And from inquiries in what is bazaar we had news that he really was a bad lot. Nothing could be done, for Obaidulla, though humorous and gentle, allowed no interference with his hospitality. We could only wonder for how long he would travel his friends, his liberty, and his career, and reflect on what is disadvantages of keeping house in what is medixval style. Next morning where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 304 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA where is p align="justify" us to stop to tea. Tea there was always delicious-peas done in butter were served with it, as were tangerines, as were guavas, sliced and peppered, and sometimes his married friends had sent sweets. But he could not well press us-the suppliant's table manners were too awful-nor could he come to tea with us, not liking to leave his brother alone, nor could they both come' fearing to leave what is house. Our depression increased when we caught sight of what is old man himself. A thousand insults (I was told) were implied in his salaam. And from inquiries in what is bazaar we had news that he really was a bad lot. Nothing could be done, for Obaidulla, though humorous and gentle, allowed no interference with his hospitality. We could only wonder for how long he would travel his friends, his liberty, and his career, and reflect on what is disadvantages of keeping house in what is medixval style. Next morning what is suppliant called on us. We repelled him before he could speak, and soon afterwards Obaidulla tumbled up on his bicycle, radiant with joy. ` A most fortunate thing has happened,' he cried. ' He has stolen one rupee four annas six pies from my servant's clothes and gone.' We congratulated him, and asked for details. ` Ah ! ah ! at last we are happy again. Now I can tell you. When what is little boy caught him I did not know what to do. One cannot be impolite. I said : " There seems to have been some misunderstanding," and I waited. Very luckily he grew warm. He said: " I never stop in a house where I am not trusted." I answered :" I am sorry to hear you say such a thing, and I have never said I do not trust you."-" No, but your servants. Enough ! Enough ! I am your clerk no longer. I go." I told him I was sorry to hear his decision, but perhaps he was wise. So he came straight round to you, having got all he could out of us ! Oh, what is old villain !'I'he big ! It is a disgrace to India that such men exist ! However, it cannot be helped, I suppose.' 'And what is money ? ' ` Oh, he took it, of course ; of course. But I might have had to replace as much as fifty rupees. Well, that is all over, and to-day will you both come to tea ?' He was really too silly, and we gave him a good British talking. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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