Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 295

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA

into the first. As I gazed at it I realized that it was no river, but part of the ruined palace, and that men had carved it, as they had carved the stones.
Going back, I mi§sed the shallows and had to wade. The pools, too shallow for alligators, suggested leeches, but all was well, and in the plain beyond a tonga wandered aimlessly. It was mine, and my driver was not surprised that we had all met again. Safe on the high road, I realized that I had not given one thought to the past. Was that really Vikramaditya's palace ? Had Kalidas and the other eight ever prayed in those radiant waters ? Kalidas describes Ujjain. In his poem of The Cloud Messenger-a poem as ill-planned and charming as my own expedition-he praises the beloved city. He feigns that a demi-god, exiled from his lady, employs a cloud to take her a message from him. An English cloud would go, but this is Hindu. The poem is occupied by an account of the places it might pass if it went far enough out of its course, and of those places the most out-of-the-way is Ujjain. Were the cloud to stray thither, it would enter the city with Sipra, the sacred stream, and would hear the old country people singing songs of mirth in the streets. While- maidens clapped their hands, and peacocks their wings, it might enter perfumed balconies as a shower, or as a sunset radiance might cling round the arm of Shiva. In the evening, when women steal to their lovers ` through darkness that a needle might divide,' the cloud might show them the way by noiseless lightning-flash, and weary of their happiness and its own might repose itself among sleeping doves till dawn. Such was Kalidas' account of his home, and the other eight-was not one of them a lexicographer ?-may have sported there with him. The groves near must have suggested to him the magic grove in Sakuntala, where the wood nymphs pushed wedding garments through the leaves. ` Whence came these ornaments ?' one of the characters inquires, ` Has the holy hermit created them by an effort of his mind ?' The conclusion, though natural, is wrong. ` Not quite,' answers another. ' The sweet trees bore them unaided. While we gathered blossoms, fairy hands were stretched out.' Cries a third, ` We are only poor girls. How shall we know how such ornaments are put on ? Still, we have seen pictures. We can imitate them.' They adorn the bride ...

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE into what is first. As I gazed at it I realized that it was no river, but part of what is ruined palace, and that men had carved it, as they had carved what is stones. Going back, I mi§sed what is shallows and had to wade. what is pools, too shallow for alligators, suggested leeches, but all was well, and in what is plain beyond a tonga wandered aimlessly. It was mine, and my driver was not surprised that we had all met again. Safe on what is high road, I realized that I had not given one thought to what is past. Was that really Vikramaditya's palace ? Had Kalidas and what is other eight ever prayed in those radiant waters ? Kalidas describes Ujjain. In his poem of what is Cloud Messenger-a poem as ill-planned and charming as my own expedition-he praises what is beloved city. He feigns that a demi-god, exiled from his lady, employs a cloud to take her a message from him. An English cloud would go, but this is Hindu. what is poem where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 295 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA where is p align="justify" into what is first. As I gazed at it I realized that it was no river, but part of what is ruined palace, and that men had carved it, as they had carved what is stones. Going back, I mi§sed what is shallows and had to wade. what is pools, too shallow for alligators, suggested leeches, but all was well, and in what is plain beyond a tonga wandered aimlessly. It was mine, and my driver was not surprised that we had all met again. Safe on what is high road, I realized that I had not given one thought to what is past. Was that really Vikramaditya's palace ? Had Kalidas and what is other eight ever prayed in those radiant waters ? Kalidas describes Ujjain. In his poem of what is Cloud Messenger-a poem as ill-planned and charming as my own expedition-he praises what is beloved city. He feigns that a demi-god, exiled from his lady, employs a cloud to take her a message from him. An English cloud would go, but this is Hindu. what is poem is occupied by an account of what is places it might pass if it went far enough out of its course, and of those places what is most out-of-the-way is Ujjain. Were what is cloud to stray thither, it would enter what is city with Sipra, what is sacred stream, and would hear what is old country people singing songs of mirth in what is streets. While- maidens clapped their hands, and peacocks their wings, it might enter perfumed balconies as a shower, or as a sunset radiance might cling round what is arm of Shiva. In what is evening, when women steal to their persons ` through darkness that a needle might divide,' what is cloud might show them what is way by noiseless lightning-flash, and weary of their happiness and its own might repose itself among sleeping doves till dawn. Such was Kalidas' account of his home, and what is other eight-was not one of them a lexicographer ?-may have sported there with him. what is groves near must have suggested to him what is magic grove in Sakuntala, where what is wood nymphs pushed wedding garments through what is leaves. ` Whence came these ornaments ?' one of what is characters inquires, ` Has what is holy hermit created them by an effort of his mind ?' what is conclusion, though natural, is wrong. ` Not quite,' answers another. ' what is sweet trees bore them unaided. While we gathered blossoms, fairy hands were stretched out.' Cries a third, ` We are only poor girls. How shall we know how such ornaments are put on ? Still, we have seen pictures. We can imitate them.' They adorn what is bride ... where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330