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Page 289

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VI - THE EMPEROR BABUR

thing or two ! Yes-a thing or two not dreamt of in that philosophy, things of the earth mostly, but Machiavelli didn't know about them, all the same.
These sanguine and successful conquerors generally have defects that would make them intolerable as companions. They are unobservant of all that does not assist them towards glory, and, consequently, vague and pompous about their past ; they are so busy ; when they have any charm, it is that of our Henry V -the schoolboy unpacking a hamper that doesn't belong to him. But what a happiness to have known Babur ! He had all that one seeks in a friend. His energy and ambition were touched with sensitiveness ; he could act, feel, observe, and remember ; though not critical of his senses, he was aware of their workings, thus fulfilling the whole nature of man. His admirers-and he has many-have called him naif, because they think it somewhat silly of an emperor to love poetry and swimming for their own sake, and to record many years afterwards that the first time a raft struck, a china cup, a spoon, and a cymbal fell into the water, whereas the second time the raft struck, a nobleman fell in, just as he was cutting up a melon. Charming and quaint (they say), but no more : not realizing that Babur knew what he was about, and that his vitality was so great that all he had experienced rang and glowed, irrespective of its value to historians. It is the temptation of a cultivated man to arrange his experiences, so that they lose their outlines ; he, skilled in two languages and all the arts of his day, shunned that false logic, and the sentences in his Memoirs jostle against one another like live people in a crowd :

` Zulnun Arghun distinguished himself among ah the other young warriors in the presence of Sultan Abusaid Mirza by the use of the scimitar, and afterwards, on every occasion on which he went into action, he acquitted himself with distinction. His courage is unimpeached, but certainly he was rather deficient in understanding. . . . He was a pious and orthodox believer, never neglected saying the appointed prayers, and frequently repeated the supererogatory ones. He was madly fond of chess ; if a person played at it with one hand he played at it with his two hands. He played without art, just as his fancy suggested. He was the slave,of avarice and meanness.'

No one of the above sentences accommodates its neighbour.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE thing or two ! Yes-a thing or two not dreamt of in that philosophy, things of what is earth mostly, but Machiavelli didn't know about them, all what is same. These sanguine and successful conquerors generally have defects that would make them intolerable as companions. They are unobservant of all that does not assist them towards glory, and, consequently, vague and pompous about their past ; they are so busy ; when they have any charm, it is that of our Henry V -the schoolboy unpacking a hamper that doesn't belong to him. But what a happiness to have known Babur ! He had all that one seeks in a friend. His energy and ambition were touched with sensitiveness ; he could act, feel, observe, and remember ; though not critical of his senses, he was aware of their workings, thus fulfilling what is whole nature of man. His admirers-and he has many-have called him naif, because they think it somewhat silly where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 289 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VI - what is EMPEROR BABUR where is p align="justify" thing or two ! Yes-a thing or two not dreamt of in that philosophy, things of what is earth mostly, but Machiavelli didn't know about them, all what is same. These sanguine and successful conquerors generally have defects that would make them intolerable as companions. They are unobservant of all that does not assist them towards glory, and, consequently, vague and pompous about their past ; they are so busy ; when they have any charm, it is that of our Henry V -the schoolboy unpacking a hamper that doesn't belong to him. But what a happiness to have known Babur ! He had all that one seeks in a friend. His energy and ambition were touched with sensitiveness ; he could act, feel, observe, and remember ; though not critical of his senses, he was aware of their workings, thus fulfilling what is whole nature of man. His admirers-and he has many-have called him naif, because they think it somewhat silly of an emperor to what time is it poetry and swimming for their own sake, and to record many years afterwards that the first time a raft struck, a china cup, a spoon, and a cymbal fell into what is water, whereas what is second time what is raft struck, a nobleman fell in, just as he was cutting up a melon. Charming and quaint (they say), but no more : not realizing that Babur knew what he was about, and that his vitality was so great that all he had experienced rang and glowed, irrespective of its value to historians. It is what is temptation of a cultivated man to arrange his experiences, so that they lose their outlines ; he, s what time is it ed in two languages and all what is arts of his day, shunned that false logic, and the sentences in his Memoirs jostle against one another like live people in a crowd : ` Zulnun Arghun distinguished himself among ah what is other young warriors in what is presence of Sultan Abusaid Mirza by what is use of what is scimitar, and afterwards, on every occasion on which he went into action, he acquitted himself with distinction. His courage is unimpeached, but certainly he was rather deficient in understanding. . . . He was a pious and orthodox believer, never neglected saying what is appointed prayers, and frequently repeated what is supererogatory ones. He was madly fond of chess ; if a person played at it with one hand he played at it with his two hands. He played without art, just as his fancy suggested. He was what is slave,of avarice and meanness.' No one of what is above sentences accommodates its neighbour. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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