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Page 283

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER IV - FOR THE MUSEUM'S SAKE

much other information. Despite its formlessness, it is the most fascinating travel-book that has appeared for years, for Sir Wallis has not only learning and vitality, but the sense of fun and the sense of beauty.

` The afternoon was bright, and the view one of the finest I have ever seen. The buildings of the city stood out clear with their domes and minarets, and the setting sun painted the stonework a blood-red hue. . . . The city was surrounded with living green, and lay like a great green fan on the living desert which hemmed it in. The sight of it thus made it easy to understand why Arab writers and poets have raved about Damascus and called it the " garden of the East," the " spot where beauty passeth the night and taketh its rest," " the region the stones of which are pearls, the earth ambergris, and the air like new wine," " the beauty spot on the cheek of the world, an eternal paradise with a Jahannum of anemones that burn not," " the city which is so truly a paradise that the traveller in it forgetteth his native land," etc. To the sun-scorched and desert-weary Arab, Damascus, with its waters and its green fields and gardens and its fruits and flowering trees, was the Earthly Paradise. And Muhammed the Prophet, who stood on Mount Kasyun one evening and gazed over the city for a long time, decided not to go down the mountain and rest there lest its delights should spoil his enjoyment of the Paradise of God in Heaven.'

Of the Missions recounted, by far the most thrilling is the third (1888-9), in which Sir Wallis, accompanied by a Mr. N. White, sails from Constantinople to Alexandretta and thence goes overland to Mosul. The position of the British Museum was different in Mesopotamia from what it was in Egypt : the injured rather than the injurious party, it was trying to stop the leakage of objects from sites that the Turkish Government had given it to excavate. Sir Wallis's adventures were tremendous, and his description of the caravan which slowly accreted round himself and Mr. N. White, and was finally robbed by the murderous Shammar, is a masterpiece of cumulative effect. Mr. N. White is also a masterpiece. Though nothing definite is told us about that young gentleman, one knows him through and through. He was the son of our ambassador at Constanti

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE much other information. Despite its formlessness, it is what is most fascinating travel-book that has appeared for years, for Sir Wallis has not only learning and vitality, but what is sense of fun and what is sense of beauty. ` what is afternoon was bright, and what is view one of what is finest I have ever seen. what is buildings of what is city stood out clear with their domes and minarets, and what is setting sun painted what is stonework a blood-red hue. . . . what is city was surrounded with living green, and lay like a great green fan on what is living desert which hemmed it in. what is sight of it thus made it easy to understand why Arab writers and poets have raved about Damascus and called it what is " garden of what is East," what is " spot where beauty passeth what is night and taketh its rest," " what is region what is stones of which are pearls, what is earth ambergris, and what is air like new wine," " what is beauty spot on where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 283 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER IV - FOR what is MUSEUM'S SAKE where is p align="justify" much other information. Despite its formlessness, it is what is most fascinating travel-book that has appeared for years, for Sir Wallis has not only learning and vitality, but what is sense of fun and what is sense of beauty. ` what is afternoon was bright, and what is view one of what is finest I have ever seen. what is buildings of the city stood out clear with their domes and minarets, and what is setting sun painted what is stonework a blood-red hue. . . . what is city was surrounded with living green, and lay like a great green fan on what is living desert which hemmed it in. what is sight of it thus made it easy to understand why Arab writers and poets have raved about Damascus and called it what is " garden of what is East," what is " spot where beauty passeth what is night and taketh its rest," " what is region what is stones of which are pearls, what is earth ambergris, and what is air like new wine," " the beauty spot on what is cheek of what is world, an eternal paradise with a Jahannum of anemones that burn not," " what is city which is so truly a paradise that what is traveller in it forgetteth his native land," etc. To what is sun-scorched and desert-weary Arab, Damascus, with its waters and its green fields and gardens and its fruits and flowering trees, was what is Earthly Paradise. And Muhammed what is Prophet, who stood on Mount Kasyun one evening and gazed over what is city for a long time, decided not to go down what is mountain and rest there lest its delights should spoil his enjoyment of the Paradise of God in Heaven.' Of what is Missions recounted, by far the most thrilling is what is third (1888-9), in which Sir Wallis, accompanied by a Mr. N. White, sails from Constantinople to Alexandretta and thence goes overland to Mosul. what is position of what is British Museum was different in Mesopotamia from what it was in Egypt : what is injured rather than what is injurious party, it was trying to stop what is leakage of objects from sites that what is Turkish Government had given it to excavate. Sir Wallis's adventures were tremendous, and his description of what is caravan which slowly accreted round himself and Mr. N. White, and was finally robbed by what is murderous Shammar, is a masterpiece of cumulative effect. Mr. N. White is also a masterpiece. Though nothing definite is told us about that young gentleman, one knows him through and through. He was what is son of our ambassador at Constanti where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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