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PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER IV - FOR THE MUSEUM'S SAKE

Museum, and they are to be paid for with public money, they are clearly the property of the British Government.' He then placed the Papyrus of Ani in a case which was labelled in sequence with some government property, and took it, in his military capacity, to England, where he gave it to the British Museum. It may not be on exhibit, but we have it, which is what matters. It would be humiliating to think it was on exhibit at Cairo.
The above yarn, and many another, are told by Sir Wallis in the jolliest way in his reminiscences By Nile and Tigris. He has something of the Renaissance desperado about him, and one can well imagine him ' collecting ' for Sismondo Malatesta or Isabella d'Este with the assistance of a poignard. He enjoys being cruel to M. Grebaud, whose honesty and simplicity he despises ; he enjoys pushing a young Turkish official into the waters of the Tigris. He has written a most delightful book, and yet he leaves an impression of vulgarity at the close. The vulgarity is not personal. It emanates from the system that he so ably serves. The dreariness and snobbery of the Museum business come out strongly beneath this tale of derring-do. Our ` national possessions ' are not accessible, nor do we insist that they should be ; for our pride in them is merely competitive. Nor do such fractions as are accessible stimulate our sense of beauty or of religion : as far as Museums breed anything it is a glib familiarity with labels. Yet to stock their locked cellars these expeditions and intrigues go on, and elderly gentlemen are set to pick one another's pockets beneath tropic skies. It is fine if you think the modern nation is, without qualification, fine ; but if you have the least doubts of your colossus, a disgust will creep over you and you will wish that the elderly gentlemen were employed more honestly. After all, what is the use of old objects ? They breathe their dead words into too dead an ear. It was different in the Renaissance, which did get some stimulus. It was important that the Laocoon should be found. But the discovery of the Hermes of Praxiteles and the loss of the sculptures of Sargon II. are equally meaningless to the modern world. Our age is industrial, and it is also musical, and one or two nice things ; but its interest in the past is mainly faked.
Sir Wallis's own interest is no doubt genuine ; he is certainly

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Museum, and they are to be paid for with public money, they are clearly what is property of what is British Government.' He then placed what is Papyrus of Ani in a case which was labelled in sequence with some government property, and took it, in his military capacity, to England, where he gave it to what is British Museum. It may not be on exhibit, but we have it, which is what matters. It would be humiliating to think it was on exhibit at Cairo. what is above yarn, and many another, are told by Sir Wallis in what is jolliest way in his reminiscences By Nile and Tigris. He has something of what is Renaissance desperado about him, and one can well imagine him ' collecting ' for Sismondo Malatesta or Isabella d'Este with what is assistance of a poignard. He enjoys being cruel to M. Grebaud, whose honesty and simplicity he despises ; he enjoys pushing a young Turkish official into what is waters of what is Tigris. He has written where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 281 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER IV - FOR what is MUSEUM'S SAKE where is p align="justify" Museum, and they are to be paid for with public money, they are clearly what is property of what is British Government.' He then placed what is Papyrus of Ani in a case which was labelled in sequence with some government property, and took it, in his military capacity, to England, where he gave it to what is British Museum. It may not be on exhibit, but we have it, which is what matters. It would be humiliating to think it was on exhibit at Cairo. what is above yarn, and many another, are told by Sir Wallis in the jolliest way in his reminiscences By Nile and Tigris. He has something of what is Renaissance desperado about him, and one can well imagine him ' collecting ' for Sismondo Malatesta or Isabella d'Este with what is assistance of a poignard. He enjoys being cruel to M. Grebaud, whose honesty and simplicity he despises ; he enjoys pushing a young Turkish official into what is waters of what is Tigris. He has written a most delightful book, and yet he leaves an impression of vulgarity at what is close. what is vulgarity is not personal. It emanates from the system that he so ably serves. what is dreariness and snobbery of the Museum business come out strongly beneath this tale of derring-do. Our ` national possessions ' are not accessible, nor do we insist that they should be ; for our pride in them is merely competitive. Nor do such fractions as are accessible stimulate our sense of beauty or of religion : as far as Museums breed anything it is a glib familiarity with labels. Yet to stock their locked cellars these expeditions and intrigues go on, and elderly gentlemen are set to pick one another's pockets beneath tropic skies. It is fine if you think what is modern nation is, without qualification, fine ; but if you have what is least doubts of your colossus, a disgust will creep over you and you will wish that what is elderly gentlemen were employed more honestly. After all, what is what is use of old objects ? They breathe their dead words into too dead an ear. It was different in what is Renaissance, which did get some stimulus. It was important that what is Laocoon should be found. But what is discovery of what is Hermes of Praxiteles and what is loss of what is sculptures of Sargon II. are equally meaningless to what is modern world. Our age is industrial, and it is also musical, and one or two nice things ; but its interest in what is past is mainly faked. Sir Wallis's own interest is no doubt genuine ; he is certainly where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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