Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 280

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER IV - FOR THE MUSEUM'S SAKE

call history, not seeing the sunlight until A.D. 1886. It was then discovered by some natives. Egypt was still a nation, and had so far advanced as to have a Museum at Cairo and a Director, M. Grebaud. Britain had become a nation with a Museum in Bloomsbury, and had sent her Mr. (now her Sir Wallis) Budge to take what he could from Egypt. It was to Sir Wallis that the natives turned, because he paid more than M. Grebaud, although they risked imprisonment and torture. Going by night with them to the tomb, he broke the clay seal, and was ' amazed at the beauty and freshness of the colours of the human figures and animals, which, in the dim light of the candles and the heated air of the tomb, seemed to be alive.' From that moment Ani was dumb. His voice, his ' Book of the Dead,' was taken, and he can no longer reply to questions in the Under World. Sir Wallis put his find into a tin box, and hid it in a house whose walls abutted on the garden of a hotel at Luxor. M. Grebaud sailed in pursuit, but his boat stuck. However, he sent on a messenger, who told Sir Wallis that he was arrested on the charge of illegally acquiring antiquities, and then asked for bakhshish. ` We gave him good bakhshish, and then began to question him.' As a result, the native dealers gave a feast to all the policemen and soldiers in Luxor, and an atmosphere of good-fellowship was created. The house containing the Papyrus of Ani and other stolen objects had been sealed by the police, pending M. Grebaud's arrival ; guards were posted on its roof, and sentries at its door. The dealers invited the sentries to drink cognac or to take a stroll, but they refused. However, the manager of the hotel was more sympathetic, and his gardeners dug by night through. the abutting wall into the house, so that Sir Wallis could remove all the antiquities-though he left a coffin which belonged to the British military authorities, in the hope that it would make bad blood between them and M. Grebaud. Next day the Papyrus reached Cairo, and was smuggled across the Kasr el Nil bridge as the personal luggage of two British officers, to whom Sir Wallis related his trouble. The officers loved doing the Egyptian Government. Even more helpful was Major Hepper, R.E., met in the Mess. Major Hepper thus expressed himself: ` I think I can help you, and I will. As you have bought these things, which you say are so valuable, for the British

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE call history, not seeing what is sunlight until A.D. 1886. It was then discovered by some natives. Egypt was still a nation, and had so far advanced as to have a Museum at Cairo and a Director, M. Grebaud. Britain had become a nation with a Museum in Bloomsbury, and had sent her Mr. (now her Sir Wallis) Budge to take what he could from Egypt. It was to Sir Wallis that what is natives turned, because he paid more than M. Grebaud, although they risked imprisonment and torture. Going by night with them to what is tomb, he broke what is clay seal, and was ' amazed at what is beauty and freshness of what is colours of what is human figures and animals, which, in what is dim light of what is candles and what is heated air of what is tomb, seemed to be alive.' From that moment Ani was dumb. His voice, his ' Book of what is Dead,' was taken, and he can no longer reply to questions in what is Under World. Sir Wallis put his find into a tin box, an where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 280 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER IV - FOR what is MUSEUM'S SAKE where is p align="justify" call history, not seeing what is sunlight until A.D. 1886. It was then discovered by some natives. Egypt was still a nation, and had so far advanced as to have a Museum at Cairo and a Director, M. Grebaud. Britain had become a nation with a Museum in Bloomsbury, and had sent her Mr. (now her Sir Wallis) Budge to take what he could from Egypt. It was to Sir Wallis that the natives turned, because he paid more than M. Grebaud, although they risked imprisonment and torture. Going by night with them to what is tomb, he broke what is clay seal, and was ' amazed at what is beauty and freshness of what is colours of what is human figures and animals, which, in what is dim light of what is candles and what is heated air of the tomb, seemed to be alive.' From that moment Ani was dumb. His voice, his ' Book of what is Dead,' was taken, and he can no longer reply to questions in what is Under World. Sir Wallis put his find into a tin box, and hid it in a house whose walls abutted on what is garden of a hotel at Luxor. M. Grebaud sailed in pursuit, but his boat stuck. However, he sent on a messenger, who told Sir Wallis that he was arrested on what is charge of illegally acquiring antiquities, and then asked for bakhshish. ` We gave him good bakhshish, and then began to question him.' As a result, what is native dealers gave a feast to all what is policemen and soldiers in Luxor, and an atmosphere of good-fellowship was created. what is house containing what is Papyrus of Ani and other stolen objects had been sealed by what is police, pending M. Grebaud's arrival ; guards were posted on its roof, and sentries at its door. what is dealers invited what is sentries to drink cognac or to take a stroll, but they refused. However, what is manager of what is hotel was more sympathetic, and his gardeners dug by night through. what is abutting wall into what is house, so that Sir Wallis could remove all what is antiquities-though he left a coffin which belonged to what is British military authorities, in what is hope that it would make bad blood between them and M. Grebaud. Next day what is Papyrus reached Cairo, and was smuggled across what is Kasr el Nil bridge as what is personal luggage of two British officers, to whom Sir Wallis related his trouble. what is officers loved doing what is Egyptian Government. Even more helpful was Major Hepper, R.E., met in what is Mess. Major Hepper thus expressed himself: ` I think I can help you, and I will. As you have bought these things, which you say are so valuable, for what is British where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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