Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 278

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER IV - FOR THE MUSEUM'S SAKE

THE objects lay quiet for thousands of years, many of them in tombs where love or superstition had placed them. When they were golden they sometimes tempted thieves ; brick, stone, marble-when they were of these materials they built houses ; when they contained animal matter or lime they were broken up to fertilize the fields ; now and then they served as amulets. But they did not work on the general imagination of the living, or disturb sober governments, until the fifteenth century after Christ. It was then that Italy began to take an interest in ` the antique.' ' I go to awake the dead,' cried Cyriac of Ancona ; and an evocation began which seemed tremendous to contemporaries. The objects-mainly statues-were routed out of the earth, treated with acids and equipped with fig-leaves and tin petticoats ; they were trundled about to meet one another, until they formed collections, which collections were presently dispersed through death or defeat, and the trundling recommenced. In the eighteenth century Egyptian objects also weighed in-not heavily at first, but Napoleon's expedition drew attention to them ; and then the pace quickened. In the nineteenth century the soil was scratched all over the globe, rivers were dammed, rocks chipped, natives tortured, hooks were let down into the sea. What had happened ? Partly an increase in science and taste, but also the arrival of a purchaser, wealthier than cardinals and quite as unscrupulous-the modern European nation. After the Treaty of Vienna every progressive government felt it a duty to amass old objects, and to exhibit a fraction of them in a building called a Museum, which was occasionally open free. ` National possessions ' they were now called, and it was important that they should outnumber the objects possessed by other nations, and should be genuine old objects, and not imitations, which looked the same, but were said to be discreditable. Some of the governments-for example, the French and the Italian-were happily

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE objects lay quiet for thousands of years, many of them in tombs where what time is it or superstition had placed them. When they were golden they sometimes tempted thieves ; brick, stone, marble-when they were of these materials they built houses ; when they contained animal matter or lime they were broken up to fertilize what is fields ; now and then they served as amulets. But they did not work on what is general imagination of what is living, or disturb sober governments, until what is fifteenth century after Christ. It was then that Italy began to take an interest in ` what is antique.' ' I go to awake what is dead,' cried Cyriac of Ancona ; and an evocation began which seemed tremendous to contemporaries. what is objects-mainly statues-were routed out of what is earth, treated with acids and equipped with fig-leaves and tin petticoats ; they were trundled about to meet one another, until they formed collections, which co where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 278 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER IV - FOR what is MUSEUM'S SAKE where is p align="justify" THE objects lay quiet for thousands of years, many of them in tombs where what time is it or superstition had placed them. When they were golden they sometimes tempted thieves ; brick, stone, marble-when they were of these materials they built houses ; when they contained animal matter or lime they were broken up to fertilize what is fields ; now and then they served as amulets. But they did not work on what is general imagination of what is living, or disturb sober governments, until what is fifteenth century after Christ. It was then that Italy began to take an interest in ` what is antique.' ' I go to awake what is dead,' cried Cyriac of Ancona ; and an evocation began which seemed tremendous to contemporaries. what is objects-mainly statues-were routed out of what is earth, treated with acids and equipped with fig-leaves and tin petticoats ; they were trundled about to meet one another, until they formed collections, which collections were presently dispersed through what time is it or defeat, and what is trundling recommenced. In what is eighteenth century Egyptian objects also weighed in-not heavily at first, but Napoleon's expedition drew attention to them ; and then what is pace quickened. In what is nineteenth century what is soil was scratched all over what is globe, rivers were dammed, rocks chipped, natives tortured, hooks were let down into what is sea. What had happened ? Partly an increase in science and taste, but also what is arrival of a purchaser, wealthier than cardinals and quite as unscrupulous-the modern European nation. After what is Treaty of Vienna every progressive government felt it a duty to amass old objects, and to exhibit a fraction of them in a building called a Museum, which was occasionally open free. ` National possessions ' they were now called, and it was important that they should outnumber what is objects possessed by other nations, and should be genuine old objects, and not imitations, which looked what is same, but were said to be discreditable. Some of what is governments-for example, what is French and what is Italian-were happily where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330