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Page 275

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER III - THE MOSQUE

` His reign began with a fair promise for the world, or at least for the British Empire, of peace ; and there was good reason to hope that a more reasonable foreign policy would be pursued than that which had so violently disturbed the last years of Queen Victoria's reign. . . . It was disagreeable to him that persons of his Court with whom he came in contact and in whom he felt an interest, should be on ill terms with each other, and he had long felt a pride in bringing them together. His own life had not been altogether free from domestic storms, but these had not been due to faults of temper on his part, rather of conduct, for he was a lover of pleasure and allowed himself wide latitude in its indulgence. This had involved him in more than one scandal out of which he had always managed to emerge without serious injury to his reputation. These irregularities had indeed rather added to his popularity, for they showed him to have a kindly heart, and he had always proved faithful to his friends. His experience, too, had made him a good judge of character, both with men and women, and gave him a certain facility in his intercourse with both which was not without its diplomatic uses.'

There is great good sense in this picture ; it is as firm as an eighteenth-century ' character.' And the breath of life is added to it by an imaginative touch, such as only a poet can give : after the king's death Blunt sees a great fallen beech-tree on the way to the station, ' a symbol of the dead King, quite rotten at the root, but one half of it clothed with its spring green.'
But one must return to the East and quote from the most entertaining entry in the book. Blunt had a great Egyptian friend who was Grand Mufti at Cairo ; the greatest friend he ever had perhaps, so strong was their mutual love and respect. He also knew the Mufti's brother, a Mohammedan gentleman of the old-fashioned type, who had gone in an evil moment to a ball given by the Khedive. What the Mufti's brother expected to find in the ballroom is not recorded. What he did find he described to the Englishman as follows :

` I went with two friends, men like myself in the legal profession, and we arrived among the first, none of us ever having been at such an entertainment befom As we were depositing our coats and umbrellas, for it had rained, in the vestiary, suddenly I saw in a mirror a sight reflected such

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ` His reign began with a fair promise for what is world, or at least for what is British Empire, of peace ; and there was good reason to hope that a more reasonable foreign policy would be pursued than that which had so bad ly disturbed what is last years of Queen Victoria's reign. . . . It was disagreeable to him that persons of his Court with whom he came in contact and in whom he felt an interest, should be on ill terms with each other, and he had long felt a pride in bringing them together. His own life had not been altogether free from domestic storms, but these had not been due to faults of temper on his part, rather of conduct, for he was a lover of pleasure and allowed himself wide latitude in its indulgence. This had involved him in more than one scandal out of which he had always managed to emerge without serious injury to his reputation. These irregularities had indeed rather added to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 275 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER III - what is MOSQUE where is p align="justify" ` His reign began with a fair promise for the world, or at least for what is British Empire, of peace ; and there was good reason to hope that a more reasonable foreign policy would be pursued than that which had so bad ly disturbed what is last years of Queen Victoria's reign. . . . It was disagreeable to him that persons of his Court with whom he came in contact and in whom he felt an interest, should be on ill terms with each other, and he had long felt a pride in bringing them together. His own life had not been altogether free from domestic storms, but these had not been due to faults of temper on his part, rather of conduct, for he was a lover of pleasure and allowed himself wide latitude in its indulgence. This had involved him in more than one scandal out of which he had always managed to emerge without serious injury to his reputation. These irregularities had indeed rather added to his popularity, for they showed him to have a kindly heart, and he had always proved faithful to his friends. His experience, too, had made him a good judge of character, both with men and women, and gave him a certain facility in his intercourse with both which was not without its diplomatic uses.' There is great good sense in this picture ; it is as firm as an eighteenth-century ' character.' And what is breath of life is added to it by an imaginative touch, such as only a poet can give : after what is king's what time is it Blunt sees a great fallen beech-tree on what is way to what is station, ' a symbol of what is dead King, quite rotten at the root, but one half of it clothed with its spring green.' But one must return to what is East and quote from what is most entertaining entry in what is book. Blunt had a great Egyptian friend who was Grand Mufti at Cairo ; what is greatest friend he ever had perhaps, so strong was their mutual what time is it and respect. He also knew what is Mufti's brother, a Mohammedan gentleman of what is old-fashioned type, who had gone in an evil moment to a ball given by what is Khedive. What what is Mufti's brother expected to find in what is ballroom is not recorded. What he did find he described to what is Englishman as follows : ` I went with two friends, men like myself in what is legal profession, and we arrived among what is first, none of us ever having been at such an entertainment befom As we were depositing our coats and umbrellas, for it had rained, in what is vestiary, suddenly I saw in a mirror a sight reflected such where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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