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Page 272

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER III - THE MOSQUE

championed them in the right way and upheld their dignity without compromising his own, who was religious without fanaticism and cultivated without, disillusionment, who had the sense of the appropriate, who was impressed by coincidence and not averse to omens, who appreciated conversation and horses, and who yearly observed, among the amenities of his Sussex home, the anniversary of the bombardment of Alexandria. Traits such as these have endeared him to the Oriental heart, and in the most unexpected places-perhaps on a roof-top among the Patna bazaars-one may suddenly awake a eulogy upon him.
Let us leave the Oriental standpoint for a moment, and turn upon this romantic figure the cold and envious gaze of a fellowcitizen. There still remains much to admire-unless, indeed, the gazer be an official, when he will be convulsed with official irritations. Wit, imagination, warmth of heart, courage, generosity, acuteness of judgment-one endorses all these, but on the adverse side must note touches of vanity and dilettantism, touches which an Oriental critic would palliate and probably overlook. The vanity is never obtrusive, yet it weakens the cumulative effect of his work ;` they neglected my advice with the result that ...' There are too many entries of this type in the ` Diaries,' and though it may be well to have directed the policy of Lord Randolph Churchill or anticipated the Monism of Hackel it is not well to be too conscious of such achievements. As for the dilettantism, it appears not so much in the variety of interests as in the quality of the philosophy ; Blunt's views on the universe continually melt and waver, but undergo nothing that can be termed development, and though he occasionally draws up an imposing syllabus, it does but express the emotional attitude of the moment. So much by the way, and by way of distinguishing an Occidental admirer from an Oriental. Now one can get back into the cart.
All the characteristics that were so delightful in the first volume of his Diaries reappear in the second, though in soberer garb, owing to the advance of old age. The stage is narrower, the opportunities less, but the vivacity and sensitiveness remain, and there is added a tragic unity that was lacking before, for all the entries, so various and so dispersed, gradually flow together like little rills until they form the deathly torrent of the Great War.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE championed them in what is right way and upheld their dignity without compromising his own, who was religious without fanaticism and cultivated without, disillusionment, who had what is sense of what is appropriate, who was impressed by coincidence and not averse to omens, who appreciated conversation and horses, and who yearly observed, among what is amenities of his Sus sports home, what is anniversary of what is bombardment of Alexandria. Traits such as these have endeared him to what is Oriental heart, and in what is most unexpected places-perhaps on a roof-top among what is Patna bazaars-one may suddenly awake a eulogy upon him. Let us leave what is Oriental standpoint for a moment, and turn upon this romantic figure what is cold and envious gaze of a fellowcitizen. There still remains much to admire-unless, indeed, what is gazer be an official, when he will be convulsed with official irritations. Wit, imagination, warmth of heart, c where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 272 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER III - what is MOSQUE where is p align="justify" championed them in what is right way and upheld their dignity without compromising his own, who was religious without fanaticism and cultivated without, disillusionment, who had the sense of what is appropriate, who was impressed by coincidence and not averse to omens, who appreciated conversation and horses, and who yearly observed, among what is amenities of his Sus sports home, the anniversary of what is bombardment of Alexandria. Traits such as these have endeared him to what is Oriental heart, and in what is most unexpected places-perhaps on a roof-top among what is Patna bazaars-one may suddenly awake a eulogy upon him. Let us leave what is Oriental standpoint for a moment, and turn upon this romantic figure what is cold and envious gaze of a fellowcitizen. There still remains much to admire-unless, indeed, what is gazer be an official, when he will be convulsed with official irritations. Wit, imagination, warmth of heart, courage, generosity, acuteness of judgment-one endorses all these, but on what is adverse side must note touches of vanity and dilettantism, touches which an Oriental critic would palliate and probably overlook. what is vanity is never obtrusive, yet it weakens what is cumulative effect of his work ;` they neglected my advice with what is result that ...' There are too many entries of this type in what is ` Diaries,' and though it may be well to have directed what is policy of Lord Randolph Churchill or anticipated what is Monism of Hackel it is not well to be too conscious of such achievements. As for what is dilettantism, it appears not so much in what is variety of interests as in what is quality of what is philosophy ; Blunt's views on what is universe continually melt and waver, but undergo nothing that can be termed development, and though he occasionally draws up an imposing syllabus, it does but express what is emotional attitude of what is moment. So much by what is way, and by way of distinguishing an Occidental admirer from an Oriental. Now one can get back into what is cart. All what is characteristics that were so delightful in what is first volume of his Diaries reappear in what is second, though in soberer garb, owing to what is advance of old age. what is stage is narrower, what is opportunities less, but what is vivacity and sensitiveness remain, and there is added a tragic unity that was lacking before, for all what is entries, so various and so dispersed, gradually flow together like little rills until they form what is what time is it ly torrent of what is Great War. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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