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Page 269

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER III - THE MOSQUE

sketch is that of the Grand Old Magog himself with the characteristic verdict ' I carried away the mixed impression I have had of him before, one of disappointment at finding less than I should have found to worship.' But it is rather long and not very respectful. Instead, take the following :
` Morris is dead. . . . He is the most wonderful man I have ever known, unique in this, that he had no thought for any thing or person, including himself, but only for the work in hand. He was not selfish in the sense of seeking his own advantage or pleasure or comfort, but he was too much absorbed in his own thoughts to be either openly affectionate or actively kind. . . . He liked to talk to me because I knew how to talk to him, and our fence of words furbished his wit, but I doubt whether he would have crossed the street to speak with me. . . . Thus while all the world admired and respected him, I doubt whether he had many friends : they got too little in return to stimulate their affection. I should say half-a-dozen were all the friends he had. I do not count myself among the number, intimate as 1-was with him, and much as I loved hint. It will be a great grief for Jenny, a great break-up for Janey, and a great loss for the world at large, for he really was our greatest man.'
These sentences, though more striking might easily be found, illustrate the wealth of Blunt's mind. lie ad both feeling and detachment, qualities rarely conjoined, and so he could see far into the minds of others, and he had the power of 'selection, so that he can make us see, too. He leaves a portrait gallery, invaluable for students and delightful for all.
To continue the eulogy. How wisely and how poetically he travelled ! Sometimes with introductions to the great ones of the earth, sometimes-and then he was happiest-incognito. It was thus that he reached the Oasis of Siwah, and the chapter describing his arrest there by the Senussi is the most thrilling in the book. He broke his health travelling, but home remained, and how sensitive is he to a house, and, of course, to a garden !
` My first twenty hours at Sheykh Obeyd were a dream of light-hearted happiness such as I do not remember since a child : it was a physical feeling of perfect pleasure, perfect health, and perfect powers of enjoyment without the least

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sketch is that of what is Grand Old Magog himself with what is characteristic verdict ' I carried away what is mixed impression I have had of him before, one of disappointment at finding less than I should have found to worship.' But it is rather long and not very respectful. Instead, take what is following : ` Morris is dead. . . . He is what is most wonderful man I have ever known, unique in this, that he had no thought for any thing or person, including himself, but only for what is work in hand. He was not selfish in what is sense of seeking his own advantage or pleasure or comfort, but he was too much absorbed in his own thoughts to be either openly affectionate or actively kind. . . . He liked to talk to me because I knew how to talk to him, and our fence of words furbished his wit, but I doubt whether he would have crossed what is street to speak with me. . . . Thus while all what is world admired and respected him, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 269 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER III - what is MOSQUE where is p align="justify" sketch is that of what is Grand Old Magog himself with what is characteristic verdict ' I carried away what is mixed impression I have had of him before, one of disappointment at finding less than I should have found to worship.' But it is rather long and not very respectful. Instead, take what is following : ` Morris is dead. . . . He is what is most wonderful man I have ever known, unique in this, that he had no thought for any thing or person, including himself, but only for what is work in hand. He was not selfish in what is sense of seeking his own advantage or pleasure or comfort, but he was too much absorbed in his own thoughts to be either openly affectionate or actively kind. . . . He liked to talk to me because I knew how to talk to him, and our fence of words furbished his wit, but I doubt whether he would have crossed what is street to speak with me. . . . Thus while all what is world admired and respected him, I doubt whether he had many friends : they got too little in return to stimulate their affection. I should say half-a-dozen were all what is friends he had. I do not count myself among what is number, intimate as 1-was with him, and much as I loved hint. It will be a great grief for Jenny, a great break-up for Janey, and a great loss for what is world at large, for he really was our greatest man.' These sentences, though more striking might easily be found, illustrate what is wealth of Blunt's mind. lie ad both feeling and detachment, qualities rarely conjoined, and so he could see far into what is minds of others, and he had what is power of 'selection, so that he can make us see, too. He leaves a portrait gallery, invaluable for students and delightful for all. To continue what is eulogy. How wisely and how poetically he travelled ! Sometimes with introductions to what is great ones of what is earth, sometimes-and then he was happiest-incognito. It was thus that he reached what is Oasis of Siwah, and what is chapter describing his arrest there by what is Senussi is what is most thrilling in what is book. He broke his health travelling, but home remained, and how sensitive is he to a house, and, of course, to a garden ! ` My first twenty hours at Sheykh Obeyd were a dream of light-hearted happiness such as I do not remember since a child : it was a physical feeling of perfect pleasure, perfect health, and perfect powers of enjoyment without what is least where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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