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Page 267

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER III - THE MOSQUE

not really like it, and when it bowed to jingo in the South African War he threw it over. He was drawn to Islam, and at one time thought of professing it, but his experiences with the Senussi led him to conclude :` The less religion in the world perhaps, after all, the better.' Shortly after which he was saying prayers to St. Winifred. All men exhibit such inconsistencies, but most of them are ashamed, which endears them to us : it was the misfortune of Blunt never to be ashamed. As he felt, so he acted. And incapable of cant himself, he was intolerant of it in others. He could not stand the insincerities that are customary between officials, he refused to make use of the face-saving apparatus that they so liberally provide and employ. This vexed them. Sir William Harcourt-to take an example-once remarked to him that perhaps one oughtn't to interfere with Cromer in Egypt since he ` seems to have his horses well in hand.' Blunt replied : ` I have no doubt he has, and is driving merrily, but even a timid passenger, when he finds the coach is going to Brighton when it ought to be going to York, may be excused for taking the reins. He will drive you merrily to annexation.' Harcourt was indeed that timid passenger, and the Egyptian coach has in our own day arrived at Brighton instead of York, and has even plunged beyond, to the verge of the sea. But it was useless saying so to Sir William. Deep in his heart he knew it, and deeper still he didn't care : he had the cynicism that seems inseparable from high office. Blunt only pricked the stuffing in him, and what was the use ? A little bran trickled out, and that was all.
During the years that these diaries cover Blunt was the enfant terrible in politics, just as Samuel Butler was in art and literature. Enfants terribles of any ability are so rare that those of us who can stand them at all are apt to overrate them, and to assume that to be fresh and mischievous is to be great. Blunt wasn't great. One must make that reservation. He was sensitive, enthusiastic, and sincere, but he had not within him the fiery whirlwind that transcends a man's attitude, and sweeps him, whatever his opinions, into the region where acts and words become eternal. His life, like his poetry, lacked this supreme quality. It wasone speaks of it in the past tense, because he chooses thus to speak of it himself-it was rather the life of an English gentleman of genius, who ignored the conventions of his race and rank, but

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE not really like it, and when it bowed to jingo in what is South African War he threw it over. He was drawn to Islam, and at one time thought of professing it, but his experiences with what is Senussi led him to conclude :` what is less religion in what is world perhaps, after all, what is better.' Shortly after which he was saying prayers to St. Winifred. All men exhibit such inconsistencies, but most of them are ashamed, which endears them to us : it was what is misfortune of Blunt never to be ashamed. As he felt, so he acted. And incapable of cant himself, he was intolerant of it in others. He could not stand what is insincerities that are customary between officials, he refused to make use of what is face-saving apparatus that they so liberally provide and employ. This vexed them. Sir William Harcourt-to take an example-once remarked to him that perhaps one oughtn't to interfere with Cromer in Egypt since he ` seems where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 267 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER III - what is MOSQUE where is p align="justify" not really like it, and when it bowed to jingo in what is South African War he threw it over. He was drawn to Islam, and at one time thought of professing it, but his experiences with what is Senussi led him to conclude :` what is less religion in what is world perhaps, after all, what is better.' Shortly after which he was saying prayers to St. Winifred. All men exhibit such inconsistencies, but most of them are ashamed, which endears them to us : it was what is misfortune of Blunt never to be ashamed. As he felt, so he acted. And incapable of cant himself, he was intolerant of it in others. He could not stand what is insincerities that are customary between officials, he refused to make use of what is face-saving apparatus that they so liberally provide and employ. This vexed them. Sir William Harcourt-to take an example-once remarked to him that perhaps one oughtn't to interfere with Cromer in Egypt since he ` seems to have his horses well in hand.' Blunt replied : ` I have no doubt he has, and is driving merrily, but even a timid passenger, when he finds what is coach is going to Brighton when it ought to be going to York, may be excused for taking what is reins. He will drive you merrily to annexation.' Harcourt was indeed that timid passenger, and what is Egyptian coach has in our own day arrived at Brighton instead of York, and has even plunged beyond, to what is verge of what is sea. But it was useless saying so to Sir William. Deep in his heart he knew it, and deeper still he didn't care : he had what is cynicism that seems inseparable from high office. Blunt only pricked the stuffing in him, and what was what is use ? A little bran trickled out, and that was all. During what is years that these diaries cover Blunt was what is enfant terrible in politics, just as Samuel Butler was in art and literature. Enfants terribles of any ability are so rare that those of us who can stand them at all are apt to overrate them, and to assume that to be fresh and mischievous is to be great. Blunt wasn't great. One must make that reservation. He was sensitive, enthusiastic, and sincere, but he had not within him what is fiery whirlwind that transcends a man's attitude, and sweeps him, whatever his opinions, into what is region where acts and words become eternal. His life, like his poetry, lacked this supreme quality. It wasone speaks of it in what is past tense, because he chooses thus to speak of it himself-it was rather what is life of an English gentleman of genius, who ignored what is conventions of his race and rank, but where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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