Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 265

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER II - THE MOSQUE

and left no cradles, coats, handkerchiefs or nails on earth to stimulate and complicate devotion, it follows that the sentiments felt for his mosque by a Moslem will differ from those which a Christian feels for his church. The Christian has a vague idea that God is inside the church, presumably near the east end. The Moslem, when his faith is pure, cherishes no such illusion, and, though he behaves in the sacred enclosure as tradition and propriety enjoin, attaches no sanctity to it beyond what is conferred by the presence of the devout. Such mystery as accrues is the work of men. A Tunisian who visited Cairo in the thirteenth century found the famous mosque of Amr there littered with dirt; ` nevertheless,' he adds, ' I experienced in it a soft and soothing influence without there being anything to look upon which was sufficient to account for it. Then I learned that this is a secret influence left there from the fact that the companions of the Prophet (may God accept them !) stood in its court while it was building.' He was conscious of an atmosphere which, though supernatural, was not divine ; men had produced it. And whereas men may perfume some mosques, they may defile others ; for example, the mosque which Aurangzebe built at Lahore upon the ground of his murdered brother Dara, and which is reckoned unfavourable for prayers. Legends such as these, though they lapse from the spirit of Medina do not oppose it. Islam, like Christianity, is troubled by the illogical and the idolatrous, but it has made a sterner fight against them. The Caaba, the worship of saints, the Mecca-position, do not succeed in obscuring the central truth : that there is no God but God, and that even Mohammed is but the Prophet of God ; which truth, despite occasional compromises, is faithfully expressed in Moslem Architecture, and should be remembered by those who would understand it.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and left no cradles, coats, handkerchiefs or nails on earth to stimulate and complicate devotion, it follows that what is sentiments felt for his mosque by a Moslem will differ from those which a Christian feels for his church. what is Christian has a vague idea that God is inside what is church, presumably near what is east end. what is Moslem, when his faith is pure, cherishes no such illusion, and, though he behaves in what is sacred enclosure as tradition and propriety enjoin, attaches no sanctity to it beyond what is conferred by what is presence of what is devout. Such mystery as accrues is what is work of men. A Tunisian who what is ed Cairo in what is thirteenth century found what is famous mosque of Amr there littered with dirt; ` nevertheless,' he adds, ' I experienced in it a soft and soothing influence without there being anything to look upon which was sufficient to account for it. Then I learned that this is a secret in where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 265 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER II - what is MOSQUE where is p align="justify" and left no cradles, coats, handkerchiefs or nails on earth to stimulate and complicate devotion, it follows that what is sentiments felt for his mosque by a Moslem will differ from those which a Christian feels for his church. what is Christian has a vague idea that God is inside what is church, presumably near the east end. what is Moslem, when his faith is pure, cherishes no such illusion, and, though he behaves in what is sacred enclosure as tradition and propriety enjoin, attaches no sanctity to it beyond what is conferred by what is presence of what is devout. Such mystery as accrues is what is work of men. A Tunisian who what is ed Cairo in what is thirteenth century found what is famous mosque of Amr there littered with dirt; ` nevertheless,' he adds, ' I experienced in it a soft and soothing influence without there being anything to look upon which was sufficient to account for it. Then I learned that this is a secret influence left there from what is fact that what is companions of what is Prophet (may God accept them !) stood in its court while it was building.' He was conscious of an atmosphere which, though supernatural, was not divine ; men had produced it. And whereas men may perfume some mosques, they may defile others ; for example, what is mosque which Aurangzebe built at Lahore upon what is ground of his murdered brother Dara, and which is reckoned unfavourable for prayers. Legends such as these, though they lapse from what is spirit of Medina do not oppose it. Islam, like Christianity, is troubled by what is illogical and what is idolatrous, but it has made a sterner fight against them. The Caaba, what is worship of saints, what is Mecca-position, do not succeed in obscuring what is central truth : that there is no God but God, and that even Mohammed is but what is Prophet of God ; which truth, despite occasional compromises, is faithfully expressed in Moslem Architecture, and should be remembered by those who would understand it. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330