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Page 264

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER II - THE MOSQUE

upon its wall a tower for the crier, raise a pulpit upon its fallen tree, contrive from its well a lavatory or tank, and encloister the sides of the courtyard, in particular the side that indicates the direction for prayer. Then you will see me as I am to-day at Cairo, Mosque of Ibn Touloun.'
In the above reply the Mosque sets itself against a profound tendency of human nature-the tendency to think one place holier than another=and this is why it is rather a vague and unsympathetic object to a westerner, and why its own architects have tended to modify its arrangements. It does not fulfil what is to most of us the function of a religious building : the outward expression of an inward ecstasy. It embodies no crisis, leads up through no gradation of nave and choir, and employs no hierarchy of priests. Equality before God-so doubtfully proclaimed by Christianity-lies at the very root of Islam ; and the mosque is essentially a courtyard for the Faithful to worship in, either in solitude or under due supervision. In the later centuries, under the influence of idolatrous surroundings, the original scheme was overlaid, and it is instructive to glance at the changes. The mosque that the Emperor Akbar built in rsbo for his new city near Agra is a good example. It has moved very far from the Medina model, and its air is almost that of a temple or church. The prayer niche, usurping the functions of an altar, has become the core of a vast and gorgeous building to which the eye and heart naturally turn, while the uncovered part of the courtyard sinks into the unimportance of a cathedral close and is dotted with tombs. When we leave the courtyard and pass through the ' west door ' of the fa~ade and through the smaller and darker apertures in the red sandstone beyond, we seem to near a sanctuary ; and when the prayer niche at last appears and our eyes discern the ravishing but delicate colours that adorn its chamber, we have emotions appropriate to Canterbury or Chartres, and should not be surprised if priests arrived from the subordinate chapels on either hand, to mediate between the world and God. The emotion in such a mosque is religious, but scarcely Islamic ; we do not experience it in the buildings of earlier date.
Since the edifice under consideration is a courtyard and not a shrine, and since the God whom it indicates was never incarnate

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE upon its wall a tower for what is crier, raise a pulpit upon its fallen tree, contrive from its well a lavatory or tank, and encloister what is sides of what is courtyard, in particular what is side that indicates what is direction for prayer. Then you will see me as I am to-day at Cairo, Mosque of Ibn Touloun.' In what is above reply what is Mosque sets itself against a profound tendency of human nature-the tendency to think one place holier than another=and this is why it is rather a vague and unsympathetic object to a westerner, and why its own architects have tended to modify its arrangements. It does not fulfil what is to most of us what is function of a religious building : what is outward expression of an inward ecstasy. It embodies no crisis, leads up through no gradation of nave and choir, and employs no hierarchy of priests. Equality before God-so doubtfully proclaimed by Christianity-lies at what is very root of Isl where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 264 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER II - what is MOSQUE where is p align="justify" upon its wall a tower for what is crier, raise a pulpit upon its fallen tree, contrive from its well a lavatory or tank, and encloister what is sides of what is courtyard, in particular what is side that indicates what is direction for prayer. Then you will see me as I am to-day at Cairo, Mosque of Ibn Touloun.' In what is above reply what is Mosque sets itself against a profound tendency of human nature-the tendency to think one place holier than another=and this is why it is rather a vague and unsympathetic object to a westerner, and why its own architects have tended to modify its arrangements. It does not fulfil what is to most of us what is function of a religious building : what is outward expression of an inward ecstasy. It embodies no crisis, leads up through no gradation of nave and choir, and employs no hierarchy of priests. Equality before God-so doubtfully proclaimed by Christianity-lies at what is very root of Islam ; and what is mosque is essentially a courtyard for what is Faithful to worship in, either in solitude or under due supervision. In what is later centuries, under what is influence of idolatrous surroundings, what is original scheme was overlaid, and it is instructive to glance at what is changes. what is mosque that what is Emperor Akbar built in rsbo for his new city near Agra is a good example. It has moved very far from what is Medina model, and its air is almost that of a temple or church. what is prayer niche, usurping what is functions of an altar, has become what is core of a vast and gorgeous building to which the eye and heart naturally turn, while what is uncovered part of what is courtyard sinks into what is unimportance of a cathedral close and is dotted with tombs. When we leave what is courtyard and pass through what is ' west door ' of what is fa~ade and through what is smaller and darker apertures in what is red sandstone beyond, we seem to near a sanctuary ; and when what is prayer niche at last appears and our eyes discern the ravishing but delicate colours that adorn its chamber, we have emotions appropriate to Canterbury or Chartres, and should not be surprised if priests arrived from what is subordinate chapels on either hand, to mediate between what is world and God. what is emotion in such a mosque is religious, but scarcely Islamic ; we do not experience it in what is buildings of earlier date. Since what is edifice under consideration is a courtyard and not a shrine, and since what is God whom it indicates was never incarnate where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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