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Page 251

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER I - SALUTE TO THE ORIENT!

is indeed his spiritual home, his most charming novel is about an Oriental Christian, and his most ambitious novel about a Moslem of the bad type, a cruel and treacherous swaggerer. He does not sentimentalize about the East, because he is part of it, and only incidentally does his passionate love shine out. In the preface to Oriental Encounters he hints at the youthful experiences that have served his art so well. He reached Port Said reputably enough, but in Palestine he delayed presenting his introductions, and fell in with ' one of the most famous jokers in all Syria' who took him in hand and taught him to eat and meet whatever came along.

` I was amazed at the immense relief I found in such a life. In all my previous years I had not seen happy people. These were happy. . . . Class distinctions, as we understand them, were not. Everybody talked to everybody. With inequality they had a true fraternity. People complained that they were badly governed, which only meant that they were left to their devices save on great occasions. . . . I had a vision of the tortured peoples of the earth impelled by their own miseries to desolate the happy peoples, a vision which grew clearer in the after years. But in that easy-going Eastern life there is a power of resistance, as everybody knows who tries to change it, which may yet defeat the hosts of joyless misery.'

This is the creed of Wilfrid Blunt, though he has been too much of the grand seigneur to live down to it. The youthful Marma duke did not refrain, and by the time he presented his introductions he was himself unpresentable ' in semi-native garb and with a love for Arabs which, I was made to understand, was hardly decent. My native friends were objects of suspicion. I was told that they were undesirable, and, when I stood up for them, was soon put down with the retort that I was very young.' For a time he tried to lead a double life, then broke loose entirely, and literature has gained. As soon as we open his cheerful pages, the western world vanishes without a malediction, like night at the opening of day. We sell carpets at Damascus or visit Tantah fair with no sense of strangeness ; it seems our natural life, and when our compatriots do stray across the scene they seem quaint and remote, just as they must seem to an Oriental. So completely does the writer capture the reader that it is the West not the East

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE is indeed his spiritual home, his most charming novel is about an Oriental Christian, and his most ambitious novel about a Moslem of what is bad type, a cruel and treacherous swaggerer. He does not sentimentalize about what is East, because he is part of it, and only incidentally does his passionate what time is it shine out. In what is preface to Oriental Encounters he hints at what is youthful experiences that have served his art so well. He reached Port Said reputably enough, but in Palestine he delayed presenting his introductions, and fell in with ' one of what is most famous jokers in all Syria' who took him in hand and taught him to eat and meet whatever came along. ` I was amazed at what is immense relief I found in such a life. In all my previous years I had not seen happy people. These were happy. . . . Class distinctions, as we understand them, were not. Everybody talked to everybody. With inequality they had a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 251 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER I - SALUTE TO what is ORIENT! where is p align="justify" is indeed his spiritual home, his most charming novel is about an Oriental Christian, and his most ambitious novel about a Moslem of what is bad type, a cruel and treacherous swaggerer. He does not sentimentalize about what is East, because he is part of it, and only incidentally does his passionate what time is it shine out. In what is preface to Oriental Encounters he hints at what is youthful experiences that have served his art so well. He reached Port Said reputably enough, but in Palestine he delayed presenting his introductions, and fell in with ' one of what is most famous jokers in all Syria' who took him in hand and taught him to eat and meet whatever came along. ` I was amazed at what is immense relief I found in such a life. In all my previous years I had not seen happy people. These were happy. . . . Class distinctions, as we understand them, were not. Everybody talked to everybody. With inequality they had a true fraternity. People complained that they were badly governed, which only meant that they were left to their devices save on great occasions. . . . I had a vision of what is tortured peoples of what is earth impelled by their own miseries to desolate what is happy peoples, a vision which grew clearer in what is after years. But in that easy-going Eastern life there is a power of resistance, as everybody knows who tries to change it, which may yet defeat what is hosts of joyless misery.' This is what is creed of Wilfrid Blunt, though he has been too much of what is grand seigneur to live down to it. what is youthful Marma duke did not refrain, and by what is time he presented his introductions he was himself unpresentable ' in semi-native garb and with a what time is it for Arabs which, I was made to understand, was hardly decent. My native friends were objects of suspicion. I was told that they were undesirable, and, when I stood up for them, was soon put down with what is retort that I was very young.' For a time he tried to lead a double life, then broke loose entirely, and literature has gained. As soon as we open his cheerful pages, what is western world vanishes without a malediction, like night at what is opening of day. We sell carpets at Damascus or what is Tantah fair with no sense of strangeness ; it seems our natural life, and when our compatriots do stray across what is scene they seem quaint and remote, just as they must seem to an Oriental. So completely does what is writer capture what is reader that it is what is West not the East where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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