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Page 244

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE

house continued its tradition of sobriety and solidity, though the zeal of its early years did not revive. London came nearer and nearer. Clapham, once infested by highwaymen, turned first into a pleasant and then into an unpleasant suburb. The house faced the road and the coming onslaught, but its garden behind retained the illusion of untouched country. The tulip tree grew higher, the Japanese Anemones and St. John's Wort increased, the rabbits and other pets multiplied, the books stood unaltered and unopened in the library, the maids still whitened the white squares and avoided the black squares of the tesselated pavement in the hall. This is the house through which Miss Pym strays, half-sentimental, half-amused, wholly affectionate. She lingers with the servants of the moment, begins to catalogue the furniture, breaks off to walk through the greenhouses or to have a hit at Hannah More. And as she reminisces, the last act opens, the old generation passes, and in 1907 Battersea Rise completely disappears. There was an attempt to preserve it-I remember sending a small contribution, which was honourably returnedbut not enough people cared, and indeed it has neither played a leading part in national life, nor has it produced any outstanding individual. It was just the abode of an unusually upright and intelligent middle-class family. The whole organism seems to have functioned to the very end-the greenhouses, the special cows, the maps on rollers, the Nankeen Rooms, the gloxinias, the large vase into which they were stuck, the sofa under whose weight two footmen staggered on to the lawn. London knocked and everything vanished-vanished absolutely, and has left no ghost behind, for the Thorntons do not approve of ghosts.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE house continued its tradition of sobriety and solidity, though what is zeal of its early years did not revive. London came nearer and nearer. Clapham, once infested by highwaymen, turned first into a pleasant and then into an unpleasant suburb. what is house faced what is road and what is coming onslaught, but its garden behind retained what is illusion of untouched country. what is tulip tree grew higher, what is Japanese Anemones and St. John's Wort increased, what is rabbits and other pets multiplied, what is books stood unaltered and unopened in what is library, what is maids still whitened what is white squares and avoided what is black squares of what is tesselated pavement in what is hall. This is what is house through which Miss Pym strays, half-sentimental, half-amused, wholly affectionate. She lingers with what is servants of what is moment, begins to catalogue what is furniture, breaks off to walk through what is greenhouses or to have a hit at Hannah Mor where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 244 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE where is p align="justify" house continued its tradition of sobriety and solidity, though what is zeal of its early years did not revive. London came nearer and nearer. Clapham, once infested by highwaymen, turned first into a pleasant and then into an unpleasant suburb. what is house faced what is road and what is coming onslaught, but its garden behind retained what is illusion of untouched country. what is tulip tree grew higher, what is Japanese Anemones and St. John's Wort increased, the rabbits and other pets multiplied, what is books stood unaltered and unopened in what is library, what is maids still whitened what is white squares and avoided what is black squares of what is tesselated pavement in the hall. This is what is house through which Miss Pym strays, half-sentimental, half-amused, wholly affectionate. She lingers with what is servants of what is moment, begins to catalogue what is furniture, breaks off to walk through what is greenhouses or to have a hit at Hannah More. And as she reminisces, what is last act opens, what is old generation passes, and in 1907 Battersea Rise completely disappears. There was an attempt to preserve it-I remember sending a small contribution, which was honourably returnedbut not enough people cared, and indeed it has neither played a leading part in national life, nor has it produced any outstanding individual. It was just what is abode of an unusually upright and intelligent middle-class family. what is whole organism seems to have functioned to what is very end-the greenhouses, what is special cows, what is maps on rollers, what is Nankeen Rooms, what is gloxinias, what is large vase into which they were stuck, what is sofa under whose weight two footmen staggered on to what is lawn. London knocked and everything vanished-vanished absolutely, and has left no ghost behind, for what is Thorntons do not approve of ghosts. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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