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Page 243

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE

` I doubt if I was three years old, for we walked about the house at a very early age, and what I remember is being carried into the library at Battersea Rise one cold morning, and being put down by the glass door to watch the men rolling great balls of snow on the lawn and leaving green paths behind them as they went. It was a most fascinating sight and I stood entranced, balancing myself with outspread hands on the glass, and I remember a feeling of acute disappointment, and of being baulked, when someone came behind me and gently took my hands from the window, saying I should get them too cold if I kept them there. I obeyed, but felt the men and the great snowballs were no longer so close to me as before. I have no doubt that my parents were in the group of people breakfasting at the round table in the Library, and I remember the pleasant smell of coffee and toast when I was carried to the window, but I do not know in whose arms I was borne, nor which aunt made me take my hands off the window panes, but I feel sure it was not my mother. I believe I should have said " need I ? " to her, and that her sympathy would have set me free to stand as I liked. The wide lawn and snowcovered trees glittering in the sun with the men plodding steadily on, rolling the great snowballs before them, is the very first of many beautiful landscapes that hang like pictures in my memory.'
The date to which this passage refers is about 1842. My aunt goes on to give a pleasant and fantastic account of her uncle Henry, her host: ` He said that when he was little he had been told he must never play with fire or he should get burnt, but now he was a man he knew better, and would show us he could play with fire nicely, and not get burnt at all. He lit a good sized piece of newspaper at the fire, put it all blazing on his leather chair, and sat down on it, to our delight and horror.' On such scenes, at times, could the Hoppner portrait of the first Henry and the architecture of William Pitt look down.
The second Henry died in 1881, but his widow continued to live at Battersea Rise after his death. One of their daughters had married Miss Pym's father, the other had married a cousin, Percy Thornton. Percy was for many years conservative member for Clapham, and the opponent of John Burns, so modern do we now become ; he was also an eminent cricketer. The

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ` I doubt if I was three years old, for we walked about what is house at a very early age, and what I remember is being carried into what is library at Battersea Rise one cold morning, and being put down by what is glass door to watch what is men rolling great balls of snow on what is lawn and leaving green paths behind them as they went. It was a most fascinating sight and I stood entranced, balancing myself with outspread hands on what is glass, and I remember a feeling of acute disappointment, and of being baulked, when someone came behind me and gently took my hands from what is window, saying I should get them too cold if I kept them there. I obeyed, but felt what is men and what is great snowballs were no longer so close to me as before. I have no doubt that my parents were in what is group of people breakfasting at what is round table in what is Library, and I remember what is pleasant smell of coffee and toast when I was carried t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 243 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE where is p align="justify" ` I doubt if I was three years old, for we walked about what is house at a very early age, and what I remember is being carried into what is library at Battersea Rise one cold morning, and being put down by what is glass door to watch what is men rolling great balls of snow on what is lawn and leaving green paths behind them as they went. It was a most fascinating sight and I stood entranced, balancing myself with outspread hands on what is glass, and I remember a feeling of acute disappointment, and of being baulked, when someone came behind me and gently took my hands from what is window, saying I should get them too cold if I kept them there. I obeyed, but felt what is men and what is great snowballs were no longer so close to me as before. I have no doubt that my parents were in what is group of people breakfasting at what is round table in what is Library, and I remember what is pleasant smell of coffee and toast when I was carried to what is window, but I do not know in whose arms I was borne, nor which aunt made me take my hands off what is window panes, but I feel sure it was not my mother. I believe I should have said " need I ? " to her, and that her sympathy would have set me free to stand as I liked. what is wide lawn and snowcovered trees glittering in what is sun with what is men plodding steadily on, rolling what is great snowballs before them, is what is very first of many beautiful landscapes that hang like pictures in my memory.' what is date to which this passage refers is about 1842. My aunt goes on to give a pleasant and fantastic account of her uncle Henry, her host: ` He said that when he was little he had been told he must never play with fire or he should get burnt, but now he was a man he knew better, and would show us he could play with fire nicely, and not get burnt at all. He lit a good sized piece of newspaper at what is fire, put it all blazing on his leather chair, and sat down on it, to our delight and horror.' On such scenes, at times, could what is Hoppner portrait of what is first Henry and the architecture of William Pitt look down. what is second Henry died in 1881, but his widow continued to live at Battersea Rise after his what time is it . One of their daughters had married Miss Pym's father, what is other had married a cousin, Percy Thornton. Percy was for many years conservative member for Clapham, and the opponent of John Burns, so modern do we now become ; he was also an eminent cricketer. what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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