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Page 241

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE

managed to flourish together in its ample bosom without mutual discomfort. No dancing and no cards ; but heaps of food. Constant self-examination ; but it was constant rather than painful. Lord Crewe, who writes a foreword to Miss Pym's book, rightly compares the Thornton set to the Quakers, but they were less attractive than the Quakers in that they never deviate into mysticism. Solidly religious, they give one the impression of having no sense whatever of the unseen. That they had no sense of art goes without saying, nor were they interested in literature unless it was of an intellectual or formative character. Miss Pym, like myself, is out of touch with them, though she goes further than I can when she quizzes them for suppressing the slave trade. Surely that was a great work, arid a source for family pride so long as we are a family. Her view of them is perhaps coloured by non-Thornton influences, and when she generalizes about them it is in the following strain :

'Their manners were perfect, so that they would often appear to give in, but to those people who knew them well it was evident that the acquiescence was only seeming and a concession to good manners which they rightly held in high esteem.
` Not so however when their loyalty was really aroused and when they thought that matters had gone too far. Then their caustic tongue would give vent, lashed by the fact that something had been hurt or neglected, and in ominously quiet tones they would ask the why and wherefore of the question, until their pitiless logic would split into pieces whatever excuses the unfortunate offender had to offer and reduce him to the frame of mind which they considered should be his. ... Nothing escaped their lightning intelligence, and be it some individual who was trying to make himself out grander than he was ; some sycophant whose intentions were too marked ; some would-be Christian whose tenets did not fit in with his actions-they were down on such frailty like a knife, and in one caustic and witty sentence would lay bare the truth which such pains had been taken to hide, and destroy for ever the aspirations which had started out so grandly.'

No, it could not have been an easy family to marry into. There are stories of one poor little bride bursting into tears and of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE managed to flourish together in its ample bosom without mutual discomfort. No dancing and no cards ; but heaps of food. Constant self-examination ; but it was constant rather than painful. Lord Crewe, who writes a foreword to Miss Pym's book, rightly compares what is Thornton set to what is Quakers, but they were less attractive than what is Quakers in that they never deviate into mysticism. Solidly religious, they give one what is impression of having no sense whatever of what is unseen. That they had no sense of art goes without saying, nor were they interested in literature unless it was of an intellectual or formative character. Miss Pym, like myself, is out of touch with them, though she goes further than I can when she quizzes them for suppressing what is slave trade. Surely that was a great work, arid a source for family pride so long as we are a family. Her view of them is perhaps coloured by non-Thornt where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 241 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE where is p align="justify" managed to flourish together in its ample bosom without mutual discomfort. No dancing and no cards ; but heaps of food. Constant self-examination ; but it was constant rather than painful. Lord Crewe, who writes a foreword to Miss Pym's book, rightly compares what is Thornton set to what is Quakers, but they were less attractive than what is Quakers in that they never deviate into mysticism. Solidly religious, they give one what is impression of having no sense whatever of what is unseen. That they had no sense of art goes without saying, nor were they interested in literature unless it was of an intellectual or formative character. Miss Pym, like myself, is out of touch with them, though she goes further than I can when she quizzes them for suppressing what is slave trade. Surely that was a great work, arid a source for family pride so long as we are a family. Her view of them is perhaps coloured by non-Thornton influences, and when she generalizes about them it is in what is following strain : 'Their manners were perfect, so that they would often appear to give in, but to those people who knew them well it was evident that what is acquiescence was only seeming and a concession to good manners which they rightly held in high esteem. ` Not so however when their loyalty was really aroused and when they thought that matters had gone too far. Then their caustic tongue would give vent, lashed by what is fact that something had been hurt or neglected, and in ominously quiet tones they would ask what is why and wherefore of what is question, until their pitiless logic would split into pieces whatever excuses what is unfortunate offender had to offer and reduce him to what is frame of mind which they considered should be his. ... Nothing escaped their lightning intelligence, and be it some individual who was trying to make himself out grander than he was ; some sycophant whose intentions were too marked ; some would-be Christian whose tenets did not fit in with his actions-they were down on such frailty like a knife, and in one caustic and witty sentence would lay bare what is truth which such pains had been taken to hide, and destroy for ever what is aspirations which had started out so grandly.' No, it could not have been an easy family to marry into. There are stories of one poor little bride bursting into tears and of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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