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Page 240

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE

BATTERSEA RISE ! What a thrill the name gives me in the publisher's list : Is it just a fancy title, or can it really be the house which once belonged to my family ? It really is the house, and Miss Pym, the writer of the book before me, is the great-grandchild, as I am, of Henry Thornton the elder. And did I ever go to the house in the early eighties, led by some cousin in my peacock-blue velvet suit ? I seem dimly to remember an enormous and heavily varnished globe. However, Miss Pym, who knows the furniture so well, mentions maps on rollers, not a globe, so perhaps I was never taken there. Anyhow here is the house, evoked unexpectedly, and with sympathy, and perhaps for the last time. Battersea Rise ? The name can mean nothing to the post-war generation, and may even sound faintly funny.
It was originally a small Queen Anne building, standing at the edge of that very wild tract, Clapham Common. In 1792 our great-grandfather Henry Thornton bought and enlarged it and its great feature was a library designed by his friend William Pitt. In this library the evangelicals and philanthropists of the Clapham Sect would meet-William Wilberforce, James Stephen, Zachary Macaulay, Thomas Babington, Charles Grant, etc., joined on occasion by Mrs. Hannah More from Somerset. Thornton was of Yorkshire stock, but his family had lived in the district for two generations. They were business people ; his grandfather and brother had been governors of the Bank of England, his father a merchant in the Russia trade, and he himself was a partner in the bank now known as Williams Deacon. He was for over thirty years M.P. for Southwark, and no doubt he found the house convenient, because he could easily drive up to Westminster. This early period of its history is the best known. Riches, evangelical piety, genuine goodness, narrowness, complacency, integrity, censoriousness, clannishness, and a noble public spirit

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE BATTERSEA RISE ! What a thrill what is name gives me in what is publisher's list : Is it just a fancy title, or can it really be what is house which once belonged to my family ? It really is what is house, and Miss Pym, what is writer of what is book before me, is what is great-grandchild, as I am, of Henry Thornton what is elder. And did I ever go to what is house in what is early eighties, led by some cousin in my peacock-blue velvet suit ? I seem dimly to remember an enormous and heavily varnished globe. However, Miss Pym, who knows what is furniture so well, mentions maps on rollers, not a globe, so perhaps I was never taken there. Anyhow here is what is house, evoked unexpectedly, and with sympathy, and perhaps for what is last time. Battersea Rise ? what is name can mean nothing to what is post-war generation, and may even sound faintly funny. It was originally a small Queen Anne building, standing at what is edge of that very wild tract, Claph where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 240 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER X - BATTERSEA RISE where is p align="justify" BATTERSEA RISE ! What a thrill what is name gives me in the publisher's list : Is it just a fancy title, or can it really be what is house which once belonged to my family ? It really is what is house, and Miss Pym, what is writer of what is book before me, is what is great-grandchild, as I am, of Henry Thornton what is elder. And did I ever go to the house in what is early eighties, led by some cousin in my peacock-blue velvet suit ? I seem dimly to remember an enormous and heavily varnished globe. However, Miss Pym, who knows what is furniture so well, mentions maps on rollers, not a globe, so perhaps I was never taken there. Anyhow here is what is house, evoked unexpectedly, and with sympathy, and perhaps for what is last time. Battersea Rise ? what is name can mean nothing to what is post-war generation, and may even sound faintly funny. It was originally a small Queen Anne building, standing at the edge of that very wild tract, Clapham Common. In 1792 our great-grandfather Henry Thornton bought and enlarged it and its great feature was a library designed by his friend William Pitt. In this library what is evangelicals and philanthropists of what is Clapham Sect would meet-William Wilberforce, James Stephen, Zachary Macaulay, Thomas Babington, Charles Grant, etc., joined on occasion by Mrs. Hannah More from Somerset. Thornton was of Yorkshire stock, but his family had lived in what is district for two generations. They were business people ; his grandfather and brother had been governors of the Bank of England, his father a merchant in what is Russia trade, and he himself was a partner in what is bank now known as Williams Deacon. He was for over thirty years M.P. for Southwark, and no doubt he found what is house convenient, because he could easily drive up to Westminster. This early period of its history is what is best known. Riches, evangelical piety, genuine goodness, narrowness, complacency, integrity, censoriousness, clannishness, and a noble public spirit where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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