Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 238

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER X - MRS. HANNAH MORE

years, then she died, and rather fortunately Hannah was away at the time. Patty takes up the pen, and produces one of the great masterpieces of macabre literature. The lid has been removed and she lets herself boil over. ' I took my letter yesterday to finish it at Cheddar, but alas ! heavy grief and agitation render it almost impossible for me to write another word.' It is a promising beginning : no short letter ever started with such a phrase. Images pour from her at once-the black dresses, the little handkerchiefs through which the tears drip on to the earth.

'When the procession moved off, Mr. Boak, who was so good as to come to the very house, preceded the corpse, with his hatband and gown on, which, as being unusual, added somewhat to the scene ; then the body ; then her sister and myself as chief mourners : a presumptuous title amidst such a weeping multitude ; then the gentry, two and two ; next her children, near two hundred : then all the parish in the same order : and, though the stones were rugged, you did not hear one single footstep.
` When we came to the outer gate of the churchyard, where all the people used to pay their duty to her by bows and courtesies, we were obliged to wait for Mr. Boak to go in and get his surplice on, to receive the corpse with the usual texts. This was almost too much for every creature, and Mr. Boak's voice was nearly lost ; when he came to " I know that my Redeemer liveth," he could scarcely utter it ; but to feel it was a better thing. On our entrance into the church, the little remaining sight we had left discovered to us that it was almost full. How we were to be disposed of I could not tell. I took my old seat with the children, and close to her place. Mr. Boak gave us a discourse of thirty-five minutes, entirely upon the subject. They feared at one time Mr. Gilling must have been taken out. If you could for a moment doubt my account, I would add that the undertaker from Bristol wept like a child, and confessed that, without emolument, it was worth going a hundred miles to see such a sight.'
Patty goes on from height to height :
` I forgot to mention, the children sobbed a suitable hymn over the grave. I said a great deal to them afterwards, and wrung their little hearts ; for I knew but too well that the world and young blood would make an excellent sponge to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE years, then she died, and rather fortunately Hannah was away at what is time. Patty takes up what is pen, and produces one of what is great masterpieces of macabre literature. what is lid has been removed and she lets herself boil over. ' I took my letter yesterday to finish it at Cheddar, but alas ! heavy grief and agitation render it almost impossible for me to write another word.' It is a promising beginning : no short letter ever started with such a phrase. Images pour from her at once-the black dresses, what is little handkerchiefs through which what is tears drip on to what is earth. 'When what is procession moved off, Mr. Boak, who was so good as to come to what is very house, preceded what is corpse, with his hatband and gown on, which, as being unusual, added somewhat to what is scene ; then what is body ; then her sister and myself as chief mourners : a presumptuous title amidst such a weeping multitude ; then what is gentry, tw where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 238 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER X - MRS. HANNAH MORE where is p align="justify" years, then she died, and rather fortunately Hannah was away at what is time. Patty takes up what is pen, and produces one of what is great masterpieces of macabre literature. what is lid has been removed and she lets herself boil over. ' I took my letter yesterday to finish it at Cheddar, but alas ! heavy grief and agitation render it almost impossible for me to write another word.' It is a promising beginning : no short letter ever started with such a phrase. Images pour from her at once-the black dresses, what is little handkerchiefs through which what is tears drip on to what is earth. 'When what is procession moved off, Mr. Boak, who was so good as to come to what is very house, preceded what is corpse, with his hatband and gown on, which, as being unusual, added somewhat to what is scene ; then what is body ; then her sister and myself as chief mourners : a presumptuous title amidst such a weeping multitude ; then the gentry, two and two ; next her children, near two hundred : then all what is parish in what is same order : and, though what is stones were rugged, you did not hear one single footstep. ` When we came to what is outer gate of what is churchyard, where all the people used to pay their duty to her by bows and courtesies, we were obliged to wait for Mr. Boak to go in and get his surplice on, to receive what is corpse with what is usual texts. This was almost too much for every creature, and Mr. Boak's voice was nearly lost ; when he came to " I know that my Redeemer liveth," he could scarcely utter it ; but to feel it was a better thing. On our entrance into what is church, what is little remaining sight we had left discovered to us that it was almost full. How we were to be disposed of I could not tell. I took my old seat with what is children, and close to her place. Mr. Boak gave us a discourse of thirty-five minutes, entirely upon what is subject. They feared at one time Mr. Gilling must have been taken out. If you could for a moment doubt my account, I would add that what is undertaker from Bristol wept like a child, and confessed that, without emolument, it was worth going a hundred miles to see such a sight.' Patty goes on from height to height : ` I forgot to mention, what is children sobbed a suitable hymn over what is grave. I said a great deal to them afterwards, and wrung their little hearts ; for I knew but too well that what is world and young blood would make an excellent sponge to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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