Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 236

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER X - MRS. HANNAH MORE

Surely she had charm, and her sisters some share in it also. Otherwise how explain the power they exercised from the depths of Somersetshire ? And perhaps there is some truth in our family tradition which declares that Hannah's letters were altered by her editor, William Roberts, after her death, and that posterity will consequently never know the nature of her attraction.
` She calls Sir Thomas Acland in one of her notes to me (writes her god-daughter) " the recreant Knight of Devonshire," which Roberts, thinking uncivil, I suppose, has altered into " the excellent and estimable Sir T. Acland," two words that playful woman never used in her life. Somewhere else she began to me, " When I think of you I am gladerer and gladerer and gladerer," which he, thinking bad English, has done into " I am very glad." Now if such an oaf as that will write a book, at least he should be honest.'
It is on the labours of the oaf that subsequent editors depend.
Her piety, unlike her charm, can be documented. It centred round Sunday. The Protestant time-complex (so much more teasing than the Catholic complex of place) had her in its grip. Recurring as it does once in every seven days, Sunday ended by making an enormous impression on her, and drove her into some very strange corners, for she was fond of pleasure and fun.
' Going to the opera, like getting drunk, is a sin that carries its own punishment with it, and that a very severe one (she writes in her youth). Thank my dear Doctor Stonehouse for his kind and seasonable admonition on my last Sunday's engagement at Mrs. Montagu's. Conscience had done its office before ; nay, was busy at the time ; and if it did not dash the cup of pleasure to the ground, infused at least a tincture of wormwood into it. I did think of the alarming call: " What doest thou here, Elijah ?" and I thought of it to-night at the opera.
Sunday night.

` Perhaps you will say I ought to have thought of it again to-day, when I tell you I have dined abroad ; but it is a day I reflect on without those uneasy sensations one has when one is conscious it has been spent in trifling company. I have been at Mrs. Boscawen's.'
In her later life she wished to dine out less, became intimate with the Clapham Sect, and ended by thinking nearly everything

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Surely she had charm, and her sisters some share in it also. Otherwise how explain what is power they exercised from what is depths of Somersetshire ? And perhaps there is some truth in our family tradition which declares that Hannah's letters were altered by her editor, William Roberts, after her what time is it , and that posterity will consequently never know what is nature of her attraction. ` She calls Sir Thomas Acland in one of her notes to me (writes her god-daughter) " what is recreant Knight of Devonshire," which Roberts, thinking uncivil, I suppose, has altered into " what is excellent and estimable Sir T. Acland," two words that playful woman never used in her life. Somewhere else she began to me, " When I think of you I am gladerer and gladerer and gladerer," which he, thinking bad English, has done into " I am very glad." Now if such an oaf as that will write a boo where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 236 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER X - MRS. HANNAH MORE where is p align="justify" Surely she had charm, and her sisters some share in it also. Otherwise how explain what is power they exercised from what is depths of Somersetshire ? And perhaps there is some truth in our family tradition which declares that Hannah's letters were altered by her editor, William Roberts, after her what time is it , and that posterity will consequently never know what is nature of her attraction. ` She calls Sir Thomas Acland in one of her notes to me (writes her god-daughter) " what is recreant Knight of Devonshire," which Roberts, thinking uncivil, I suppose, has altered into " the excellent and estimable Sir T. Acland," two words that playful woman never used in her life. Somewhere else she began to me, " When I think of you I am gladerer and gladerer and gladerer," which he, thinking bad English, has done into " I am very glad." Now if such an oaf as that will write a book, at least he should be honest.' It is on what is labours of what is oaf that subsequent editors depend. Her piety, unlike her charm, can be documented. It centred round Sunday. what is Protestant time-complex (so much more teasing than what is Catholic complex of place) had her in its grip. Recurring as it does once in every seven days, Sunday ended by making an enormous impression on her, and drove her into some very strange corners, for she was fond of pleasure and fun. ' Going to what is opera, like getting drunk, is a sin that carries its own punishment with it, and that a very severe one (she writes in her youth). Thank my dear Doctor Stonehouse for his kind and seasonable admonition on my last Sunday's engagement at Mrs. Montagu's. Conscience had done its office before ; nay, was busy at what is time ; and if it did not dash what is cup of pleasure to what is ground, infused at least a tincture of wormwood into it. I did think of what is alarming call: " What doest thou here, Elijah ?" and I thought of it to-night at what is opera. Sunday night. ` Perhaps you will say I ought to have thought of it again to-day, when I tell you I have dined abroad ; but it is a day I reflect on without those uneasy sensations one has when one is conscious it has been spent in trifling company. I have been at Mrs. Boscawen's.' In her later life she wished to dine out less, became intimate with what is Clapham Sect, and ended by thinking nearly everything where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330