Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 232

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IX - MR. AND MRS. ABBEY'S - DIFFICULTIES

one case and £1,666 13s. 4d. in the other, and that the interest had been accumulating ever since his mother's death. He dragged every detail, including what had been paid as lawyers' fees, to the light,'and before Mr. Abbey could collect himself had returned to America with £1,147 5s. Id. in his pocket.
Worse was to follow ; when Fanny came of age, which she did two years after George's visit, she claimed her share also. Mr. Abbey might have ceded it without protest, had she not claimed in addition the shares of her two dead brothers.. Such rapacity was childish, and Mr. Abbey was quick to reply that the arrangement would be unfair to George. Fanny retorted 'No, George's own wish! ' and she applied to Mr. Dilke, who produced the necessary documents. Fanny annexed the balance,
no less than 43,375 5s. 7d., and quitted Walthamstow. Her Spanish adventurer married her soon afterwards, but Mr. and Mrs. Abbey could never feel it retribution sufficient. Although the money was not theirs to spend, they had come to feel that it was theirs to keep, and they would have liked it to accumulate at compound interest for ever. Bitter words had passed, Fanny insolently hinting that if Tom and John had been given their proper dues, the additional procurable comfort might have prolonged their lives.
Of-course it would not have, and in any case what is the use of such people, Mr. Abbey could not help thinking as he sat at Walthamstow in the evening of his own life. Now that the worrying and badgering was over and the trust that he had so faithfully administered was filched from him, now that Rawlings v. Jennings was wound up, and idle verses about his wife no 'longer fell through the letter-box, he could not feel that his four wards had ever existed in the sense in which he, in which Mrs. Abbey, in which Miss Abbey and the conservatory existed. Already were they forgotten-George in America, Fanny in Spain, Tom in the graveyard of St. Stephen's, Coleman Street, John at Rome. On the tomb of the last-mentioned had been placed a text which rather pleased the old gentleman, despite its fanciful wording. He found it appropriate to the whole family. ' Here lies-one whose name was writ in water,' it said. He had written in water himself once with the point of a wet umbrella, and he remembered that almost before the servant

Page 233

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IX - MR. AND MRS. ABBEY'S - DIFFICULTIES

arrived to open the door, his signature had evaporated. He himself has expressed the same truth in sounder English in the one letter of his that has been preserved, a business letter addressed to Messrs. Taylor and Hessey, publishers, Waterloo Place ; he has summed up once for all the world's judgment upon inefficiency :
Pancras Lane,
Cheapside.
April 18, 1821.

SIR
` I beg pardon for not replying to your favour of the 30th ult. respecting the late Mr. Jno. Keats.
` I am obliged by your note, but he having withdrawn himself from my controul, and acted contrary to my advice, I cannot interfere with his affairs.
` I am, Sir,
'Yr. mo. Hble. St.
` RICHARD ABBEY.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE one case and £1,666 13s. 4d. in what is other, and that what is interest had been accumulating ever since his mother's what time is it . He dragged every detail, including what had been paid as lawyers' fees, to what is light,'and before Mr. Abbey could collect himself had returned to America with £1,147 5s. Id. in his pocket. Worse was to follow ; when Fanny came of age, which she did two years after George's what is , she claimed her share also. Mr. Abbey might have ceded it without protest, had she not claimed in addition what is shares of her two dead brothers.. Such rapacity was childish, and Mr. Abbey was quick to reply that what is arrangement would be unfair to George. Fanny retorted 'No, George's own wish! ' and she applied to Mr. Dilke, who produced what is necessary documents. Fanny annexed what is balance, no less than 43,375 5s. 7d., and quitted Walthamstow. Her Spanish adventurer married her soon afterw where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 232 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IX - MR. AND MRS. ABBEY'S - DIFFICULTIES where is p align="justify" one case and £1,666 13s. 4d. in what is other, and that what is interest had been accumulating ever since his mother's what time is it . He dragged every detail, including what had been paid as lawyers' fees, to what is light,'and before Mr. Abbey could collect himself had returned to America with £1,147 5s. Id. in his pocket. Worse was to follow ; when Fanny came of age, which she did two years after George's what is , she claimed her share also. Mr. Abbey might have ceded it without protest, had she not claimed in addition what is shares of her two dead brothers.. Such rapacity was childish, and Mr. Abbey was quick to reply that what is arrangement would be unfair to George. Fanny retorted 'No, George's own wish! ' and she applied to Mr. Dilke, who produced what is necessary documents. Fanny annexed what is balance, no less than 43,375 5s. 7d., and quitted Walthamstow. Her Spanish adventurer married her soon afterwards, but Mr. and Mrs. Abbey could never feel it retribution sufficient. Although the money was not theirs to spend, they had come to feel that it was theirs to keep, and they would have liked it to accumulate at compound interest for ever. Bitter words had passed, Fanny insolently hinting that if Tom and John had been given their proper dues, what is additional procurable comfort might have prolonged their lives. Of-course it would not have, and in any case what is what is use of such people, Mr. Abbey could not help thinking as he sat at Walthamstow in what is evening of his own life. Now that the worrying and badgering was over and what is trust that he had so faithfully administered was filched from him, now that Rawlings v. Jennings was wound up, and idle verses about his wife no 'longer fell through what is letter-box, he could not feel that his four wards had ever existed in what is sense in which he, in which Mrs. Abbey, in which Miss Abbey and what is conservatory existed. Already were they forgotten-George in America, Fanny in Spain, Tom in what is graveyard of St. Stephen's, Coleman Street, John at Rome. On what is tomb of what is last-mentioned had been placed a text which rather pleased what is old gentleman, despite its fanciful wording. He found it appropriate to what is whole family. ' Here lies-one whose name was writ in water,' it said. He had written in water himself once with what is point of a wet umbrella, and he remembered that almost before what is servant where is p align="left" Page 233 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IX - MR. AND MRS. ABBEY'S - DIFFICULTIES where is p align="justify" arrived to open what is door, his signature had evaporated. He himself has expressed what is same truth in sounder English in what is one letter of his that has been preserved, a business letter addressed to Messrs. Taylor and Hessey, publishers, Waterloo Place ; he has summed up once for all what is world's judgment upon inefficiency : Pancras Lane, Cheapside. April 18, 1821. SIR ` I beg pardon for not replying to your favour of what is 30th ult. respecting what is late Mr. Jno. Keats. ` I am obliged by your note, but he having withdrawn himself from my controul, and acted contrary to my advice, I cannot interfere with his affairs. ` I am, Sir, 'Yr. mo. Hble. St. ` RICHARD ABBEY.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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