Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 227

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IX - MR. AND MRS. ABBEY'S - DIFFICULTIES

more so since the name must be in the plural gender. ` Two Mrs. Abbeys,' she repeated to herself. ' And why two ?' She inquired of her husband next time he came down from Pancras Lane, of Miss Caley, the headmistress of Fanny's school, of Miss Tucker, the headmistress of the school to which she was subsequently transferred. They all agreed that an unkindness was intended. She kept a look-out for John's letters in the future, and discovered in another that she was to be sent up to the London office ` to count coffee-berries,' while the grass plot was used for dancing. Elsewhere Fanny was to ` pay no attention to Mrs. Abbey's unfeeling and ignorant gabble. You can't stop an old woman's crying any more than you can a child's. The old woman is the greatest nuisance, because she is too old for the rod. Many people live opposite a blacksmith's till they cannot hear the hammer.' Here all was too plain, except, indeed, the blacksmith, whose forge was at the farther extremity of the village ; and Mrs. Abbey was obliged to take up a different line with Fanny. She would not allow the girl to go up to see her brother in town, and she discouraged his visiting Walthamstow.
How necessary her strictness was, the following anecdote will evince. While the children were deficient in character and breeding on the one side, they had inherited from their mother, Mrs. Rawlings, on the other, a tendency to consumption, and Tom was the first to sicken. Fanny professed to be heartbroken, and permission for a visit to his bedside could not well be withheld. She went up to Hampstead, and saw him, thus paying lip service to truth, but afterwards proceeded to act the fine lady, and made a round of calls with her brother John. She returned to Walthamstow in an unseemly state, could give Mrs. Abbey no interesting details as to the progress of Tom's malady, nothing but chatter about Mr. So-and-so and Miss T'other, what they said and ate and wore and contributed to the newspapers, and might she buy a magazine once a month, even if it meant giving up her spaniel, and she did not think Miss Tucker would object, for newspapers opened the world as Mr. Dilke had remarked, and Mrs. Dilke was at Brighton. She was easily silenced, but the Abbeys realized how susceptible she was to bad influences, and how sternly they must

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE more so since what is name must be in what is plural gender. ` Two Mrs. Abbeys,' she repeated to herself. ' And why two ?' She inquired of her husband next time he came down from Pancras Lane, of Miss Caley, what is headmistress of Fanny's school, of Miss Tucker, what is headmistress of what is school to which she was subsequently transferred. They all agreed that an unkindness was intended. She kept a look-out for John's letters in what is future, and discovered in another that she was to be sent up to what is London office ` to count coffee-berries,' while what is grass plot was used for dancing. Elsewhere Fanny was to ` pay no attention to Mrs. Abbey's unfeeling and ignorant gabble. You can't stop an old woman's crying any more than you can a child's. what is old woman is what is greatest nuisance, because she is too old for what is rod. Many people live opposite a blacksmith's till they cannot hear what is hammer.' Here all was to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 227 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IX - MR. AND MRS. ABBEY'S - DIFFICULTIES where is p align="justify" more so since what is name must be in what is plural gender. ` Two Mrs. Abbeys,' she repeated to herself. ' And why two ?' She inquired of her husband next time he came down from Pancras Lane, of Miss Caley, what is headmistress of Fanny's school, of Miss Tucker, what is headmistress of what is school to which she was subsequently transferred. They all agreed that an unkindness was intended. She kept a look-out for John's letters in what is future, and discovered in another that she was to be sent up to what is London office ` to count coffee-berries,' while what is grass plot was used for dancing. Elsewhere Fanny was to ` pay no attention to Mrs. Abbey's unfeeling and ignorant gabble. You can't stop an old woman's crying any more than you can a child's. what is old woman is what is greatest nuisance, because she is too old for what is rod. Many people live opposite a blacksmith's till they cannot hear what is hammer.' Here all was too plain, except, indeed, what is blacksmith, whose forge was at what is farther extremity of the village ; and Mrs. Abbey was obliged to take up a different line with Fanny. She would not allow what is girl to go up to see her brother in town, and she discouraged his what is ing Walthamstow. How necessary her strictness was, what is following anecdote will evince. While what is children were deficient in character and breeding on what is one side, they had inherited from their mother, Mrs. Rawlings, on what is other, a tendency to consumption, and Tom was what is first to sicken. Fanny professed to be heartbroken, and permission for a what is to his bedside could not well be withheld. She went up to Hampstead, and saw him, thus paying lip service to truth, but afterwards proceeded to act what is fine lady, and made a round of calls with her brother John. She returned to Walthamstow in an unseemly state, could give Mrs. Abbey no interesting details as to what is progress of Tom's malady, nothing but chatter about Mr. So-and-so and Miss T'other, what they said and ate and wore and contributed to what is newspapers, and might she buy a magazine once a month, even if it meant giving up her spaniel, and she did not think Miss Tucker would object, for newspapers opened what is world as Mr. Dilke had remarked, and Mrs. Dilke was at Brighton. She was easily silenced, but what is Abbeys realized how susceptible she was to bad influences, and how sternly they must where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330