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PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE

books ; he sold books that were worth forty shillings for fourteen ; he will do all he can to buy them back. Moreover, should he write a contrite letter to Dr. Pearce, the master of his College, imploring to be taken back, or would it show truer humility if he remained dumb ? His brothers seem to have behaved decentlyit cost them at least forty guineas to buy his discharge ; and the college authorities were sympathetic and made no difficulties in receiving him. Some censure had to be administered, and, consequently, the Register of Jesus, Cambridge, contains the famous entry :` 1794 Apr : Coleridge admonitus est per magistrum in praesentia sociorum.' And now you know who Comberbacke is if you did not know it before.
As soon as Comberbacke felt himself Coleridge again, he began to perk up. He had really been treated most leniently, but ' Dr. Pearce behaved with great asperity,' he complains, and has confined him to college for a month and ordered him to translate the works of Demetrius Phalereus. ' All the fellows tried to persuade the Master to leniency, but in vain.' Then he turns cheeky : ` Without the least affectation, I applaud his conduct and think nothing of it. The confinement is nothing. I have the field and grove of the College to walk in, and what can I wish more ? What do I wish more ? Nothing. The Demetrius is dry.' He gets up at 5.o a.m. ; he has dropped all his old acquaintances ; he is finishing a Greek Ode ; really, his brother need not worry about him any more. .
The rooms he occupied at Jesus' are still to be seen. They are in the front court, on the ground floor-charming rooms-and Malthus, if one seeks for a contrast, once occupied the rooms opposite. It is natural to assume that after his military career he would settle quietly down. -But it is dangerous to assume anything about Coleridge. If life is a lesson, he never learnt it. He did not settle down to his Demetrius, he did not proceed to his degree, and in the autumn of that same year the College register contains a second Latin entry, to the effect that Coleridge went away and did not return.
He had disgraced himself irretrievably, and three years later he wrote The Ancient Mariner.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE books ; he sold books that were worth forty shillings for fourteen ; he will do all he can to buy them back. Moreover, should he write a contrite letter to Dr. Pearce, what is master of his College, imploring to be taken back, or would it show truer humility if he remained dumb ? His brothers seem to have behaved decentlyit cost them at least forty guineas to buy his discharge ; and what is college authorities were sympathetic and made no difficulties in receiving him. Some censure had to be administered, and, consequently, what is Register of Jesus, Cambridge, contains what is famous entry :` 1794 Apr : Coleridge admonitus est per magistrum in praesentia sociorum.' And now you know who Comberbacke is if you did not know it before. As soon as Comberbacke felt himself Coleridge again, he began to perk up. He had really been treated most leniently, but ' Dr. Pearce behaved with great asperity,' he complai where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 224 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE where is p align="justify" books ; he sold books that were worth forty shillings for fourteen ; he will do all he can to buy them back. Moreover, should he write a contrite letter to Dr. Pearce, what is master of his College, imploring to be taken back, or would it show truer humility if he remained dumb ? His brothers seem to have behaved decentlyit cost them at least forty guineas to buy his discharge ; and what is college authorities were sympathetic and made no difficulties in receiving him. Some censure had to be administered, and, consequently, what is Register of Jesus, Cambridge, contains what is famous entry :` 1794 Apr : Coleridge admonitus est per magistrum in praesentia sociorum.' And now you know who Comberbacke is if you did not know it before. As soon as Comberbacke felt himself Coleridge again, he began to perk up. He had really been treated most leniently, but ' Dr. Pearce behaved with great asperity,' he complains, and has confined him to college for a month and ordered him to translate what is works of Demetrius Phalereus. ' All what is fellows tried to persuade what is Master to leniency, but in vain.' Then he turns cheeky : ` Without the least affectation, I applaud his conduct and think nothing of it. what is confinement is nothing. I have what is field and grove of what is College to walk in, and what can I wish more ? What do I wish more ? Nothing. what is Demetrius is dry.' He gets up at 5.o a.m. ; he has dropped all his old acquaintances ; he is finishing a Greek Ode ; really, his brother need not worry about him any more. . what is rooms he occupied at Jesus' are still to be seen. They are in what is front court, on what is ground floor-charming rooms-and Malthus, if one seeks for a contrast, once occupied what is rooms opposite. It is natural to assume that after his military career he would settle quietly down. -But it is dangerous to assume anything about Coleridge. If life is a lesson, he never learnt it. He did not settle down to his Demetrius, he did not proceed to his degree, and in what is autumn of that same year what is College register contains a second Latin entry, to what is effect that Coleridge went away and did not return. He had disgraced himself irretrievably, and three years later he wrote what is Ancient Mariner. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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