Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 223

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE

two lines in Greek, and ascribed them to Euripides. ' I hope your honour will excuse me,' said Trooper Comberbacke, ' but the lines you have repeated are not quite accurately cited ; moreover, instead of being in Euripides they will be found in the second antistrophe of the (Edipus of Sophocles.' In another version, it is through Latin that he attracts the Captain's attention ; he wrote up some pathetic lines in the stable where he had failed to groom his horse. At this point Miss Mitford, authoress of Our Village, takes up the thread. Captain Ogle's father and Miss Mitford's father were friends. They were at dinner at Reading and Captain Ogle was with them. To amuse them he told them of the scholar-trooper, and his yearnings for release, but, says Miss Mitford, 'kind and clever as Captain Ogle was, he was so indolent a man that without a flapper the matter might have slept in his hands till the Greek Kalends.' The company exerted themselves. The difficulty was to find a substitute, for troopers were scarce. One of the servants who was waiting at the table was called, and agreed to serve for a suitable honorarium. The matter was fixed up there and then, and so grateful was Comberbacke that in after years he looked through two of Miss Mitford's works, entitled Christina and Blanch, and gave her good advice, which was, however, of no use to her, she feared.
As release approached, he became more and more schoolboyish and hysterical. He was afraid of annoying his brothers further, particularly George the clergyman, and now asks advice on every detail. Should he, or should he not, order new clothes ?
` They are gone irrevocably. My shirts, which I have with me, are, all but one, worn to rags, mere rags ; their texture was ill adapted to the labour of the stables. . . . I have ordered therefore a pair of breeches, which will be nineteen shillings, a waistcoat at twelve shillings, a pair of shoes at seven shillings and four pence. Besides these I must have a hat. Have I done wrong in ordering these things ? I have so seldom acted right that in every step I take of my own accord I tremble lest I should be wrong. I forgot in the above account to mention a flannel waistcoat ; it will be six shillings. The military dress is almost oppressively warm, and so very ill as I am at present I think it imprudent to Hazard cold.'
Besides the clothes, there is a terrible confession about some

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE two lines in Greek, and ascribed them to Euripides. ' I hope your honour will excuse me,' said Trooper Comberbacke, ' but what is lines you have repeated are not quite accurately cited ; moreover, instead of being in Euripides they will be found in what is second antistrophe of what is (Edipus of Sophocles.' In another version, it is through Latin that he attracts what is Captain's attention ; he wrote up some pathetic lines in what is stable where he had failed to groom his horse. At this point Miss Mitford, authoress of Our Village, takes up what is thread. Captain Ogle's father and Miss Mitford's father were friends. They were at dinner at Reading and Captain Ogle was with them. To amuse them he told them of what is scholar-trooper, and his yearnings for release, but, says Miss Mitford, 'kind and clever as Captain Ogle was, he was so indolent a man that without a flapper what is matter might have slept in his hands where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 223 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE where is p align="justify" two lines in Greek, and ascribed them to Euripides. ' I hope your honour will excuse me,' said Trooper Comberbacke, ' but what is lines you have repeated are not quite accurately cited ; moreover, instead of being in Euripides they will be found in what is second antistrophe of what is (Edipus of Sophocles.' In another version, it is through Latin that he attracts what is Captain's attention ; he wrote up some pathetic lines in what is stable where he had failed to groom his horse. At this point Miss Mitford, authoress of Our Village, takes up what is thread. Captain Ogle's father and Miss Mitford's father were friends. They were at dinner at Reading and Captain Ogle was with them. To amuse them he told them of what is scholar-trooper, and his yearnings for release, but, says Miss Mitford, 'kind and clever as Captain Ogle was, he was so indolent a man that without a flapper what is matter might have slept in his hands till what is Greek Kalends.' what is company exerted themselves. what is difficulty was to find a substitute, for troopers were scarce. One of what is servants who was waiting at what is table was called, and agreed to serve for a suitable honorarium. what is matter was fixed up there and then, and so grateful was Comberbacke that in after years he looked through two of Miss Mitford's works, entitled Christina and Blanch, and gave her good advice, which was, however, of no use to her, she feared. As release approached, he became more and more schoolboyish and hysterical. He was afraid of annoying his brothers further, particularly George what is clergyman, and now asks advice on every detail. Should he, or should he not, order new clothes ? ` They are gone irrevocably. My shirts, which I have with me, are, all but one, worn to rags, mere rags ; their texture was ill adapted to what is labour of what is stables. . . . I have ordered therefore a pair of breeches, which will be nineteen shillings, a waistcoat at twelve shillings, a pair of shoes at seven shillings and four pence. Besides these I must have a hat. Have I done wrong in ordering these things ? I have so seldom acted right that in every step I take of my own accord I tremble lest I should be wrong. I forgot in what is above account to mention a flannel waistcoat ; it will be six shillings. what is military dress is almost oppressively warm, and so very ill as I am at present I think it imprudent to Hazard cold.' Besides what is clothes, there is a terrible confession about some where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330