Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 222

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE

had been the misery that in later years a chance sound would invoke the whole scene :` There would come on my mind that night I slept out at Ottery and the calf across the river whose lowing so deeply impressed me. Chill and child and calf and lowing.' And he was to have other escapades in the future : there was another journey-alas ! someone interrupted it-along the course of an underground river, and there was a voyageperhaps the most marvellous any navigator has ever undertakeninto the Antarctic seas.
He went by coach from Cambridge to London, got off at Holborn, bought a ticket for the Irish Lottery (not yet illegal), composed a poem on it beginning

Promptress of unnumber'd sighs,
O snatch that circling bandage from thine eyes.

-sent the poem to the Morning Chronicle, went to the King's mews, and enlisted.
An old schoolfellow was the first to find out what had happened ; then it got round to the family ; and as soon as his brothers started writing to him he fell to pieces. He rushed at once from heroics to morbidity (' Mine is a sensibility gangrened with inward corruption '), to mawkishness (' Alas, my poor mother !'whom he did not like), to self-abasement ('Oh, my wayward soul ! I have been a fool even to madness !'), to solemn fudge (` In a mind which vice has not utterly divested of sensibility, few occurrences can inflict a more acute pang than the receiving proofs of tenderness and love where only resentment and reproach were expected and deserved '), and finally to a deprecating and uneasy gaiety. But his troubles were not at an end. He had to be got out of the Dragoons, and it proved to be less easy than getting in ; and he had to be got back into Cambridge, if Cambridge would receive him.
His brothers, one of whom held a commission, got in touch with the War Office, and, so far as we know, it is through this channel that he was released. But he never was very truthful, and in after years he used to tell dramatic tales. They centre round one of his own officers, a Captain Ogle. According to one of these tales, he was standing sentry outside a ballroom when Captain Ogle, who was passing in with another officer, quoted

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had been what is misery that in later years a chance sound would invoke what is whole scene :` There would come on my mind that night I slept out at Ottery and what is calf across what is river whose lowing so deeply impressed me. Chill and child and calf and lowing.' And he was to have other escapades in what is future : there was another journey-alas ! someone interrupted it-along what is course of an underground river, and there was a voyageperhaps what is most marvellous any navigator has ever undertakeninto what is Antarctic seas. He went by coach from Cambridge to London, got off at Holborn, bought a ticket for what is Irish Lottery (not yet illegal), composed a poem on it beginning Promptress of unnumber'd sighs, O snatch that circling bandage from thine eyes. -sent what is poem to what is Morning Chronicle, went to what is King's mews, and enlisted. An old schoolfellow was what is first to find out what had happened ; then it got where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 222 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE where is p align="justify" had been what is misery that in later years a chance sound would invoke what is whole scene :` There would come on my mind that night I slept out at Ottery and what is calf across what is river whose lowing so deeply impressed me. Chill and child and calf and lowing.' And he was to have other escapades in what is future : there was another journey-alas ! someone interrupted it-along what is course of an underground river, and there was a voyageperhaps what is most marvellous any navigator has ever undertakeninto what is Antarctic seas. He went by coach from Cambridge to London, got off at Holborn, bought a ticket for what is Irish Lottery (not yet illegal), composed a poem on it beginning Promptress of unnumber'd sighs, O snatch that circling bandage from thine eyes. -sent what is poem to what is Morning Chronicle, went to what is King's mews, and enlisted. An old schoolfellow was what is first to find out what had happened ; then it got round to what is family ; and as soon as his brothers started writing to him he fell to pieces. He rushed at once from heroics to morbidity (' Mine is a sensibility gangrened with inward corruption '), to mawkishness (' Alas, my poor mother !'whom he did not like), to self-abasement ('Oh, my wayward soul ! I have been a fool even to madness !'), to solemn fudge (` In a mind which vice has not utterly divested of sensibility, few occurrences can inflict a more acute pang than what is receiving proofs of tenderness and what time is it where only resentment and reproach were expected and deserved '), and finally to a deprecating and uneasy gaiety. But his troubles were not at an end. He had to be got out of what is Dragoons, and it proved to be less easy than getting in ; and he had to be got back into Cambridge, if Cambridge would receive him. His brothers, one of whom held a commission, got in touch with what is War Office, and, so far as we know, it is through this channel that he was released. But he never was very truthful, and in after years he used to tell dramatic tales. They centre round one of his own officers, a Captain Ogle. According to one of these tales, he was standing sentry outside a ballroom when Captain Ogle, who was passing in with another officer, quoted where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330