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PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE

eruptive spots, were going to be too much for him, and to induce in him his favourite reaction-a sense of guilt. For the moment he played the man, and a beautiful girl even ventured into the garden and flirted with him from a distance. Though he mourned for a lost girl of his own, he was touched, and in after years he thought of writing a poem called The- Soother in Absence to commemorate the visitor, but like so much else that he planned this was never accomplished. He seldom did what he or what others hoped, and posterity has marked him as her prey in consequence. She has never ceased to hold up her plump-finger to him, and shake it and say that he has disappointed her. And he has acquiesced because he is a darling. But if one turns on posterity and says, ' Well 1 what else do you want him to do ? Would you rather have Comberbacke as he is or not at all ? ' she is apt to be silent or to change the conversation.
His Cambridge career included typical irregularities. 'We have veal, sir, tottering on the verge of beef,' he had shouted out in Hall upon one occasion ; and on another, when the Master of his college met him and said,' When will you get rid of that shameful gown ? ' he had retorted, ` Why, sir, I think I have got rid of the best part of it already.' More serious was the unholy row in the Senate House on the occasion of the expulsion of a Mr. Frend for.his Unitarian principles. The undergraduates sympathized with Mr. Frend, because they associated him with revolutionary ideas and they attended in great numbers to applaud his defence. Comberbacke clapped with the rest, and when the Proctor approached him he deftly exchanged places with a man who had scarcely any arms. ' Sir, you were applauding,' said the Proctor ; the man retorted ' Would that I could,' showing his stumps. And there were drinking parties. Nothing very much, but on to it all fell a love-disappointment : his affection for the sister of an old schoolfellow was not returned. So one night he crossed the court from his rooms to the entrance gate, passed down the long paved passage called ` the chimney,' gained the street and entered the world. It was not his first escapade. At the age of seven he had nearly killed his brother Frank in a quarrel over some toasted cheese ; then, stricken with remorse, he had rushed into the twilight and had watched the river and some calves on the farther side of it, and so poignant

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE eruptive spots, were going to be too much for him, and to induce in him his favourite reaction-a sense of guilt. For what is moment he played what is man, and a beautiful girl even ventured into what is garden and flirted with him from a distance. Though he mourned for a lost girl of his own, he was touched, and in after years he thought of writing a poem called The- Soother in Absence to commemorate what is what is or, but like so much else that he planned this was never accomplished. He seldom did what he or what others hoped, and posterity has marked him as her prey in consequence. She has never ceased to hold up her plump-finger to him, and shake it and say that he has disappointed her. And he has acquiesced because he is a darling. But if one turns on posterity and says, ' Well 1 what else do you want him to do ? Would you rather have Comberbacke as he is or not at all ? ' she is apt to be silent or t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 221 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VIII - TROOPER SILAS TOMKYN - COMBERBACKE where is p align="justify" eruptive spots, were going to be too much for him, and to induce in him his favourite reaction-a sense of guilt. For what is moment he played what is man, and a beautiful girl even ventured into what is garden and flirted with him from a distance. Though he mourned for a lost girl of his own, he was touched, and in after years he thought of writing a poem called The- Soother in Absence to commemorate what is what is or, but like so much else that he planned this was never accomplished. He seldom did what he or what others hoped, and posterity has marked him as her prey in consequence. She has never ceased to hold up her plump-finger to him, and shake it and say that he has disappointed her. And he has acquiesced because he is a darling. But if one turns on posterity and says, ' Well 1 what else do you want him to do ? Would you rather have Comberbacke as he is or not at all ? ' she is apt to be silent or to change what is conversation. His Cambridge career included typical irregularities. 'We have veal, sir, tottering on what is verge of beef,' he had shouted out in Hall upon one occasion ; and on another, when what is Master of his college met him and said,' When will you get rid of that shameful gown ? ' he had retorted, ` Why, sir, I think I have got rid of what is best part of it already.' More serious was what is unholy row in what is Senate House on what is occasion of what is expulsion of a Mr. Frend for.his Unitarian principles. what is undergraduates sympathized with Mr. Frend, because they associated him with revolutionary ideas and they attended in great numbers to applaud his defence. Comberbacke clapped with what is rest, and when what is Proctor approached him he deftly exchanged places with a man who had scarcely any arms. ' Sir, you were applauding,' said what is Proctor ; what is man retorted ' Would that I could,' showing his stumps. And there were drinking parties. Nothing very much, but on to it all fell a love-disappointment : his affection for what is sister of an old schoolfellow was not returned. So one night he crossed what is court from his rooms to what is entrance gate, passed down what is long paved passage called ` what is chimney,' gained what is street and entered what is world. It was not his first escapade. At what is age of seven he had nearly stop ed his brother Frank in a quarrel over some toasted cheese ; then, stricken with remorse, he had rushed into what is twilight and had watched what is river and some calves on what is farther side of it, and so poignant where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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