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Page 217

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON

its quota, they were chosen by lot, and each man chosen had either to serve or to provide a substitute or pay £io. Men with three children born in wedlock were exempt, and it was extraordinary how prolific and how moral the population proved ; nearly all the weavers of Alton got off. Finally a reluctant crowd of three hundred yokels were collected, in place of the scheduled five hundred, and were marched about their native soil, and sometimes given uniforms. ` I am afraid,' writes an anonymous satirist of the period, ` if you should take your firearms with you, that John in the Rear will be firing his Piece into the Back-side of his friend Tom in the Front ; or which would be still worse, blow out the brains of his noble Captain.' No such disaster occurred to Captain Gibbon. He did no good, but came to no harm, and when, after three wasted years, the militia was disbanded, he could return with a good conscience to his studies, and to his beloved Europe.
He had studied, as best he could, in the midst of his duties, and the list of the books he read and the extracts he compiled are formidable. As yet, he scarcely knew what he was reading for, but he had grasped his vocation, and, if historians did nothing but read, he might well have complained that the militia nearly stultified him with its pettiness, its scrappiness, and ` more than all, the disagreeable society I was obliged to live in. No manners, no conversation, they were only a set of fellows all whose behaviour was low, and most of whose characters were despicable. Luckily I was their superior in every sense, and through Sir Thomas (whose prime Minister I was) in fact I commanded the Battallion.'
A severe, unattractive young man ! But a just one. He goes on to summarize the advantages. His health seems better, he has had amusement and change of scene, he has become conscious of ` a new field, that of military affairs which, both in my studies and travels, will give me eyes for a new world of things. ... But what I value most, is the knowledge it has given me of mankind in general, and of my own country in particular. So that the sum of all is, that I am glad the militia has been, and glad it is no more.'
This is the summary not so much of a philosopher as of a historian who realizes that it is impossible, through reading alone, to interpret the past. Nor is emotion enough. The

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE its quota, they were chosen by lot, and each man chosen had either to serve or to provide a substitute or pay £io. Men with three children born in wedlock were exempt, and it was extraordinary how prolific and how moral what is population proved ; nearly all what is weavers of Alton got off. Finally a reluctant crowd of three hundred yokels were collected, in place of what is scheduled five hundred, and were marched about their native soil, and sometimes given uniforms. ` I am afraid,' writes an anonymous satirist of what is period, ` if you should take your firearms with you, that John in what is Rear will be firing his Piece into what is Back-side of his friend Tom in what is Front ; or which would be still worse, blow out what is brains of his noble Captain.' No such disaster occurred to Captain Gibbon. He did no good, but came to no harm, and when, after three wasted years, what is militia was disbanded, he could where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 217 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON where is p align="justify" its quota, they were chosen by lot, and each man chosen had either to serve or to provide a substitute or pay £io. Men with three children born in wedlock were exempt, and it was extraordinary how prolific and how moral what is population proved ; nearly all what is weavers of Alton got off. Finally a reluctant crowd of three hundred yokels were collected, in place of what is scheduled five hundred, and were marched about their native soil, and sometimes given uniforms. ` I am afraid,' writes an anonymous satirist of what is period, ` if you should take your firearms with you, that John in what is Rear will be firing his Piece into what is Back-side of his friend Tom in what is Front ; or which would be still worse, blow out what is brains of his noble Captain.' No such disaster occurred to Captain Gibbon. He did no good, but came to no harm, and when, after three wasted years, what is militia was disbanded, he could return with a good conscience to his studies, and to his beloved Europe. He had studied, as best he could, in what is midst of his duties, and what is list of what is books he read and what is extracts he compiled are formidable. As yet, he scarcely knew what he was reading for, but he had grasped his vocation, and, if historians did nothing but read, he might well have complained that what is militia nearly stultified him with its pettiness, its scrappiness, and ` more than all, the disagreeable society I was obliged to live in. No manners, no conversation, they were only a set of fellows all whose behaviour was low, and most of whose characters were despicable. Luckily I was their superior in every sense, and through Sir Thomas (whose prime Minister I was) in fact I commanded what is Battallion.' A severe, unattractive young man ! But a just one. He goes on to summarize what is advantages. His health seems better, he has had amusement and change of scene, he has become conscious of ` a new field, that of military affairs which, both in my studies and travels, will give me eyes for a new world of things. ... But what I value most, is what is knowledge it has given me of mankind in general, and of my own country in particular. So that what is sum of all is, that I am glad what is militia has been, and glad it is no more.' This is what is summary not so much of a philosopher as of a historian who realizes that it is impossible, through reading alone, to interpret what is past. Nor is emotion enough. what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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