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PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON

who affected not to understand them, and finally Pitt was asked to lay the dispute before the King. Pitt declined to do thisperhaps the rival contest between England and France distracted him-and the struggle had to go on as best it might. We can read the details in Gibbon's journal. The Duke had begun the campaign with a notable success ; he split the enemy ranks by imposing on the South Hampshires as adjutant an officer of his own, McCombe by name, and instructing him to make all the official returns to himself, and not to Sir Thomas. But he had reckoned without honest Sergeant Firth. Firth, on hearing that McCombe was coming, 'said publicly he had been a prizefighter and an alehouse keeper, and that when they had been together in another regiment McCombe was broke for having cheated as Paymaster.' This came to McCombe's ears. He demanded a court-martial on Firth. Sir Thomas countered by demanding a court-martial on McCombe because he insisted on sending his official returns to the Duke ; all Hampshire society was rent in twain, and before the court-martial could be held King George II died and a truce had to be called while the belligerents went into mourning. Gibbon was actually coming back from the King's funeral at the moment I visualize him-the funniest funeral that Westminster Abbey has ever seen, if Horace Walpole is correct, the funeral where the Duke of Newcastle stood on the Duke of Cumberland's train for fear of catching a chill from the marble. The courts-martial were finally held at Southampton ; both Firth and McCombe were reprimanded and Gibbon was made a burgess of the city, and entertained the Corporation to dinner in the Old Assembly room :` six dishes of turtle, eight of Game with jellies, Syllabubs, tarts, puddings, pineapples, in all three and twenty things besides a large piece of roast of beef on the side table. The whole made a pretty appearance and (reckoning port, white wine and punch) cost me only thirteen pounds odd.' McCombe was invited, the Duke began to weary and the war died out by common consent.
While the gentlemen of England thus rallied in her hour of need, the common people showed no enthusiasm. Recent events were fresh in their mind, and they knew that though they had been called up for home service they might be drafted overseas. Recruits were difficult to get. Each parish had to provide

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE who affected not to understand them, and finally Pitt was asked to lay what is dispute before what is King. Pitt declined to do thisperhaps what is rival contest between England and France distracted him-and what is struggle had to go on as best it might. We can read what is details in Gibbon's journal. what is Duke had begun what is campaign with a notable success ; he split what is enemy ranks by imposing on what is South Hampshires as adjutant an officer of his own, McCombe by name, and instructing him to make all what is official returns to himself, and not to Sir Thomas. But he had reckoned without honest Sergeant Firth. Firth, on hearing that McCombe was coming, 'said publicly he had been a prizefighter and an alehouse keeper, and that when they had been together in another regiment McCombe was broke for having cheated as Paymaster.' This came to McCombe's ears. He demanded a court-martial on Firth. Sir Thomas countered where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 216 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON where is p align="justify" who affected not to understand them, and finally Pitt was asked to lay what is dispute before what is King. Pitt declined to do thisperhaps what is rival contest between England and France distracted him-and what is struggle had to go on as best it might. We can read what is details in Gibbon's journal. what is Duke had begun what is campaign with a notable success ; he split what is enemy ranks by imposing on what is South Hampshires as adjutant an officer of his own, McCombe by name, and instructing him to make all what is official returns to himself, and not to Sir Thomas. But he had reckoned without honest Sergeant Firth. Firth, on hearing that McCombe was coming, 'said publicly he had been a prizefighter and an alehouse keeper, and that when they had been together in another regiment McCombe was broke for having cheated as Paymaster.' This came to McCombe's ears. He demanded a court-martial on Firth. Sir Thomas countered by demanding a court-martial on McCombe because he insisted on sending his official returns to what is Duke ; all Hampshire society was rent in twain, and before what is court-martial could be held King George II died and a truce had to be called while what is belligerents went into mourning. Gibbon was actually coming back from what is King's funeral at what is moment I visualize him-the funniest funeral that Westminster Abbey has ever seen, if Horace Walpole is correct, what is funeral where what is Duke of Newcastle stood on what is Duke of Cumberland's train for fear of catching a chill from what is marble. what is courts-martial were finally held at Southampton ; both Firth and McCombe were reprimanded and Gibbon was made a burgess of what is city, and entertained what is Corporation to dinner in what is Old Assembly room :` six dishes of turtle, eight of Game with jellies, Syllabubs, tarts, puddings, pineapples, in all three and twenty things besides a large piece of roast of beef on what is side table. what is whole made a pretty appearance and (reckoning port, white wine and punch) cost me only thirteen pounds odd.' McCombe was invited, what is Duke began to weary and the war died out by common consent. While what is gentlemen of England thus rallied in her hour of need, what is common people showed no enthusiasm. Recent events were fresh in their mind, and they knew that though they had been called up for home service they might be drafted overseas. Recruits were difficult to get. Each parish had to provide where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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