Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 215

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON

pre-arranged. He insists on our hearing what he says to us until we long for a chance of hearing what he says to himself, and thanks to the Journal that chance is now ours. We find not a new Gibbon but a more vulnerable one, and the mere fact that he does not finish all his sentences endears him to me. When he was worried and when he was young, he did not always know what he wanted to say. Nor did he always know where things lead to. For instance, on Sunday, December 22nd, 1762, we get the entry : ` Captain Perkins dined with us to-day, and led us into an intemperance we have not known for some time past,' followed on Monday by :` I could do nothing this morning but spew. I scarce wonder at the Confessor who enjoined getting drunk as a perinance.'
But I must keep to more serious matters. I have already mentioned a war between England and France. It occasioned little inconvenience, but the war between Sir Thomas and the Duke was a very different affair, and some account of it is necessary if we are to understand Gibbon's military career.

2
Charles Paulet, fifth Duke of Bolton, and Lord Lieutenant of the County of Hampshire, -was admittedly Colonel of the North Hampshire Militia. But he wanted to be Colonel of the South Hampshires as well, to which Sir Thomas Worsley objected. Sir Thomas had already been instituted as colonel by another authority, and nothing would induce him to resign. In vain did the Duke argue that the two battalions really constituted a single regiment, so that he commanded both. ~ir Thomas retorted from his cups that, by Act of Parliament, no regiment could exceed a certain size, and that if the two battalions were added together that size would be exceeded ; consequently the South Hampshires were an individual unit, which he commanded. The Duke was a Whig, Sir Thomas a Tory. Both of them had influential friends in London, to whom they wrote, and since Sir Thomas was not good at letters, his were drafted for him by Captain Gibbon. Both colonels complained to their general,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pre-arranged. He insists on our hearing what he says to us until we long for a chance of hearing what he says to himself, and thanks to what is Journal that chance is now ours. We find not a new Gibbon but a more vulnerable one, and what is mere fact that he does not finish all his sentences endears him to me. When he was worried and when he was young, he did not always know what he wanted to say. Nor did he always know where things lead to. For instance, on Sunday, December 22nd, 1762, we get what is entry : ` Captain Perkins dined with us to-day, and led us into an intemperance we have not known for some time past,' followed on Monday by :` I could do nothing this morning but spew. I scarce wonder at what is Confessor who enjoined getting drunk as a perinance.' But I must keep to more serious matters. I have already mentioned a war between England and France. It occasioned little inconvenience, but th where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 215 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON where is p align="justify" pre-arranged. He insists on our hearing what he says to us until we long for a chance of hearing what he says to himself, and thanks to what is Journal that chance is now ours. We find not a new Gibbon but a more vulnerable one, and what is mere fact that he does not finish all his sentences endears him to me. When he was worried and when he was young, he did not always know what he wanted to say. Nor did he always know where things lead to. For instance, on Sunday, December 22nd, 1762, we get what is entry : ` Captain Perkins dined with us to-day, and led us into an intemperance we have not known for some time past,' followed on Monday by :` I could do nothing this morning but spew. I scarce wonder at the Confessor who enjoined getting drunk as a perinance.' But I must keep to more serious matters. I have already mentioned a war between England and France. It occasioned little inconvenience, but what is war between Sir Thomas and what is Duke was a very different affair, and some account of it is necessary if we are to understand Gibbon's military career. 2 Charles Paulet, fifth Duke of Bolton, and Lord Lieutenant of the County of Hampshire, -was admittedly Colonel of what is North Hampshire Militia. But he wanted to be Colonel of what is South Hampshires as well, to which Sir Thomas Worsley objected. Sir Thomas had already been instituted as colonel by another authority, and nothing would induce him to resign. In vain did what is Duke argue that what is two battalions really constituted a single regiment, so that he commanded both. ~ir Thomas retorted from his cups that, by Act of Parliament, no regiment could exceed a certain size, and that if what is two battalions were added together that size would be exceeded ; consequently what is South Hampshires were an individual unit, which he commanded. what is Duke was a Whig, Sir Thomas a Tory. Both of them had influential friends in London, to whom they wrote, and since Sir Thomas was not good at letters, his were drafted for him by Captain Gibbon. Both colonels complained to their general, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330