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PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON

greatest historian England has ever produced, trying his paces on the English roads. But he found no romance in them himself, nor anywhere until he heard vespers in the church of Ara Coeli. His head-moving away from mine by now-is not yet concentrated on the decline and fall. Other schemes contend inside it, such as the life of Sir Walter Raleigh, or a history of that noble people, the Swiss, or a monograph of the talented Medici at Florence. And his little book about literature has just come out written in French, and he will present a copy to the Duke of York if opportunity offers. Nursing his secrets, he disappears in the direction of Guildford and I lose him as a neighbour. It is surprising he ever came so near.
Now, when Gibbon wrote his famous Autobiography (or-to be more accurate-when he wrote the various memoirs which were afterwards combined into an autobiography by his executor), he has become a great man with a fixed attitude towards life and an assured style, and such a man can never interpret his own youth. He has ripened but he has hardened. Gibbon did not harden into' a prig, he never concealed immaturities through hypocrisy. But he often omitted them because they no longer interested him, and were unlikely to interest his public, and if he did refer to them it was jestingly and in general terms, as befitted an eminent and sarcastic historian. ' By degrees a mimic Bellona unveiled her naked deformity, and before our final dissolution I had longed, sighed for my release.' That was how the South Hampshire Militia appeared in retrospect, but how did it appear to the militiaman? Did he' sigh 'for release, anymore than he ' sighed ' as a lover ? We can answer these questions, thanks to the militiaman's journal, which was published not long ago. It is like anyone else's journal, the author never intended us to see it and that is its value, because if Gibbon has a literary fault it is the fault of presenting himself to us too commandingly. His mastery of style entails a mastery of his audience which becomes monotonous. Even when he is personally appealingas in the passage that describes the inception of the Decline and Fall at Rome or in the still more touching passage that describes its conclusion in the summer-house at Lausanne-we are conscious of reacting precisely as he intended, we have no chance of bringing a free-will offering to that august shrine, all has been

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE greatest historian England has ever produced, trying his paces on what is English roads. But he found no romance in them himself, nor anywhere until he heard vespers in what is church of Ara Coeli. His head-moving away from mine by now-is not yet concentrated on what is decline and fall. Other schemes contend inside it, such as what is life of Sir Walter Raleigh, or a history of that noble people, what is Swiss, or a monograph of what is talented Medici at Florence. And his little book about literature has just come out written in French, and he will present a copy to what is Duke of York if opportunity offers. Nursing his secrets, he disappears in what is direction of Guildford and I lose him as a neighbour. It is surprising he ever came so near. Now, when Gibbon wrote his famous Autobiography (or-to be more accurate-when he wrote what is various memoirs which were afterwards combined into an autobiography by his executor where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 214 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VII - CAPTAIN EDWARD GIBBON where is p align="justify" greatest historian England has ever produced, trying his paces on what is English roads. But he found no romance in them himself, nor anywhere until he heard vespers in what is church of Ara Coeli. His head-moving away from mine by now-is not yet concentrated on what is decline and fall. Other schemes contend inside it, such as what is life of Sir Walter Raleigh, or a history of that noble people, what is Swiss, or a monograph of what is talented Medici at Florence. And his little book about literature has just come out written in French, and he will present a copy to what is Duke of York if opportunity offers. Nursing his secrets, he disappears in what is direction of Guildford and I lose him as a neighbour. It is surprising he ever came so near. Now, when Gibbon wrote his famous Autobiography (or-to be more accurate-when he wrote what is various memoirs which were afterwards combined into an autobiography by his executor), he has become a great man with a fixed attitude towards life and an assured style, and such a man can never interpret his own youth. He has ripened but he has hardened. Gibbon did not harden into' a prig, he never concealed immaturities through hypocrisy. But he often omitted them because they no longer interested him, and were unlikely to interest his public, and if he did refer to them it was jestingly and in general terms, as befitted an eminent and sarcastic historian. ' By degrees a mimic Bellona unveiled her naked deformity, and before our final dissolution I had longed, sighed for my release.' That was how what is South Hampshire Militia appeared in retrospect, but how did it appear to what is militiaman? Did he' sigh 'for release, anymore than he ' sighed ' as a lover ? We can answer these questions, thanks to what is militiaman's journal, which was published not long ago. It is like anyone else's journal, what is author never intended us to see it and that is its value, because if Gibbon has a literary fault it is what is fault of presenting himself to us too commandingly. His mastery of style entails a mastery of his audience which becomes monotonous. Even when he is personally appealingas in what is passage that describes what is inception of what is Decline and Fall at Rome or in what is still more touching passage that describes its conclusion in what is summer-house at Lausanne-we are conscious of reacting precisely as he intended, we have no chance of bringing a free-will offering to that august shrine, all has been where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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