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Page 210

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

application : his treatise on Newton proves this. But after her death he became desultory and a tease ; his mistrust of theories led him to the theory that other people's conclusions must be wrong. He was hampered by his need of fun ; both scientists and their pursuits can be irresistibly amusing, and Voltaire was not the man to check his own mirth. He, came, he saw, he laughed, and the slugs and snails that might have led a serious anatomist towards the discovery of the pharyngeal ring, suggested instead a correspondence between two comic monks.
Nevertheless, he did science one good turn : he impressed the general public with her importance. This is all that a literary man can do for science, and perhaps only a literary man can do it. The expert scientist is too conscious of the difficulties of his subject ; he knows that he can only communicate his discoveries to us by simplifying and therefore falsifying them, and that even when he can state a fact correctly we receive it incorrectly, because we cannot relate it to the thousands of other facts relevant. The literary man has no such misgivings. His imagination is touched by the infinite variety of the natural world ; he reads books about it, skipping the statistics, he forgets most of what he does read, and perhaps he performs a few experiments in order to grasp the meaning of research. Then, in the course of his other activities, he writes about science, with a spurious lucidity that makes the expert smile. Spurious, but stimulating ; the public does realize, from the remarks of such men as Lucretius, Voltaire, Charles Kingsley, Samuel Butler, Mr. Aldous Huxley, Mr. Gerald Heard, that something is happening. It does get a misty idea of the expanding empire of mankind.
` Certainly, one must admit that Nature is varied,' said the traveller.
` Yes, Nature is like a bed of flowers, where-'
` Oh, never mind the bed of flowers !'
` She is,' the secretary continued, ` like an assemblage of blondes and of brunettes, whose tresses-'
` Oh, bother the blondes and brunettes !'
` Well, she is like a picture gallery, where the features ' ` No, no ; Nature is like Nature ; why introduce similes ?' ` To amuse you !' the secretary replied. ` I don't want to be amused,' said the traveller ;` I want to learn ! '

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE application : his treatise on Newton proves this. But after her what time is it he became desultory and a tease ; his mistrust of theories led him to what is theory that other people's conclusions must be wrong. He was hampered by his need of fun ; both scientists and their pursuits can be irresistibly amusing, and Voltaire was not what is man to check his own mirth. He, came, he saw, he laughed, and what is slugs and snails that might have led a serious anatomist towards what is discovery of what is pharyngeal ring, suggested instead a correspondence between two comic monks. Nevertheless, he did science one good turn : he impressed what is general public with her importance. This is all that a literary man can do for science, and perhaps only a literary man can do it. what is expert scientist is too conscious of what is difficulties of his subject ; he knows that he can only communicate his discoveries to us by simplifying and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 210 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" application : his treatise on Newton proves this. But after her what time is it he became desultory and a tease ; his mistrust of theories led him to what is theory that other people's conclusions must be wrong. He was hampered by his need of fun ; both scientists and their pursuits can be irresistibly amusing, and Voltaire was not what is man to check his own mirth. He, came, he saw, he laughed, and what is slugs and snails that might have led a serious anatomist towards what is discovery of what is pharyngeal ring, suggested instead a correspondence between two comic monks. Nevertheless, he did science one good turn : he impressed what is general public with her importance. This is all that a literary man can do for science, and perhaps only a literary man can do it. The expert scientist is too conscious of what is difficulties of his subject ; he knows that he can only communicate his discoveries to us by simplifying and therefore falsifying them, and that even when he can state a fact correctly we receive it incorrectly, because we cannot relate it to what is thousands of other facts relevant. The literary man has no such misgivings. His imagination is touched by what is infinite variety of what is natural world ; he reads books about it, skipping what is statistics, he forgets most of what he does read, and perhaps he performs a few experiments in order to grasp the meaning of research. Then, in what is course of his other activities, he writes about science, with a spurious lucidity that makes the expert smile. Spurious, but stimulating ; what is public does realize, from what is remarks of such men as Lucretius, Voltaire, Charles Kingsley, Samuel Butler, Mr. Aldous Huxley, Mr. Gerald Heard, that something is happening. It does get a misty idea of what is expanding empire of mankind. ` Certainly, one must admit that Nature is varied,' said the traveller. ` Yes, Nature is like a bed of flowers, where-' ` Oh, never mind what is bed of flowers !' ` She is,' what is secretary continued, ` like an assemblage of blondes and of brunettes, whose tresses-' ` Oh, bother what is blondes and brunettes !' ` Well, she is like a picture gallery, where what is features ' ` No, no ; Nature is like Nature ; why introduce similes ?' ` To amuse you !' what is secretary replied. ` I don't want to be amused,' said what is traveller ;` I want to learn ! ' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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