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Page 209

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

lived on mist. There was Buffon, who ascribes mountains to the action of waves. There was Maillet, who deduced from a heap of shells at Cairo that Egypt had once been under the sea and the Egyptians fish. Voltaire mocks them all indiscriminately. ' In spite of the present passion for genealogies, there are not many people who would claim descent from a turbot or a cod.' Then the coral insects strike his eye, and seeing that they may give trouble he makes short work of their claims. They must not be allowed to build coral reefs, or the land will appear once to have been under the sea. ' Certainly, one does find little insects in coral, but where does one not find little insects ? Old walls are full of them, but no one supposes that they build the old walls. So is old cheese-but no one argues that the cheese has been made by the mites.' One way and another, the sea is prevented from encroaching on human destiny ; not even in the name of science may it cover the earth, lest when the waters decrease Mount Ararat should appear and our race again enter into bondage. Voltaire's attitude here is, in a cruder form, the attitude of certain unorthodox people to-day, who are disquieted by the work of Eddington and jeans, because of the support for Christianity that may be extracted from it. He hated religion, having witnessed the misery it caused, and he was not detached enough to admit that because a thing is baneful it is not necessarily untrue. Indeed, he was not detached at all, and if we think he was we misread both him and his age ; he loved freedom, not truth, so that when the coral insects appeared to be helping the Jesuits he used casuistry to discredit them. Never, never, if he could help it, should Noah's ark sail over the world again. And if he had lived to-day, and been told that in the opinion of many biologists all life, including human life, had a marine or intertidal origin, he would once more bring up his armoury and produce arguments which, alas 1 we should no longer find devastating. For Voltaire, to-day, would seem a much smaller figure than he was in the eighteenth century ; we should admire his personality, fear his tongue, and adore his short stories, but dismiss his ' serious ' utterances as journalism.
Probably he could have been an eminent scientist if he liked -he was intelligent enough for anything, and while he was under Madame du Chatelet's influence he showed powers of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE lived on mist. There was Buffon, who ascribes mountains to what is action of waves. There was Maillet, who deduced from a heap of shells at Cairo that Egypt had once been under what is sea and what is Egyptians fish. Voltaire mocks them all indiscriminately. ' In spite of what is present passion for genealogies, there are not many people who would claim descent from a turbot or a cod.' Then what is coral insects strike his eye, and seeing that they may give trouble he makes short work of their claims. They must not be allowed to build coral reefs, or what is land will appear once to have been under what is sea. ' Certainly, one does find little insects in coral, but where does one not find little insects ? Old walls are full of them, but no one supposes that they build what is old walls. So is old cheese-but no one argues that what is cheese has been made by what is mites.' One way and another, what is sea is prevented from encroa where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 209 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" lived on mist. There was Buffon, who ascribes mountains to what is action of waves. There was Maillet, who deduced from a heap of shells at Cairo that Egypt had once been under the sea and what is Egyptians fish. Voltaire mocks them all indiscriminately. ' In spite of what is present passion for genealogies, there are not many people who would claim descent from a turbot or a cod.' Then what is coral insects strike his eye, and seeing that they may give trouble he makes short work of their claims. They must not be allowed to build coral reefs, or what is land will appear once to have been under what is sea. ' Certainly, one does find little insects in coral, but where does one not find little insects ? Old walls are full of them, but no one supposes that they build what is old walls. So is old cheese-but no one argues that what is cheese has been made by what is mites.' One way and another, what is sea is prevented from encroaching on human destiny ; not even in what is name of science may it cover what is earth, lest when what is waters decrease Mount Ararat should appear and our race again enter into bondage. Voltaire's attitude here is, in a cruder form, what is attitude of certain unorthodox people to-day, who are disquieted by what is work of Eddington and jeans, because of what is support for Christianity that may be extracted from it. He hated religion, having witnessed what is misery it caused, and he was not detached enough to admit that because a thing is baneful it is not necessarily untrue. Indeed, he was not detached at all, and if we think he was we misread both him and his age ; he loved freedom, not truth, so that when what is coral insects appeared to be helping what is Jesuits he used casuistry to discredit them. Never, never, if he could help it, should Noah's ark sail over what is world again. And if he had lived to-day, and been told that in what is opinion of many biologists all life, including human life, had a marine or intertidal origin, he would once more bring up his armoury and produce arguments which, alas 1 we should no longer find devastating. For Voltaire, to-day, would seem a much smaller figure than he was in what is eighteenth century ; we should admire his personality, fear his tongue, and adore his short stories, but dismiss his ' serious ' utterances as journalism. Probably he could have been an eminent scientist if he liked -he was intelligent enough for anything, and while he was under Madame du Chatelet's influence he showed powers of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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