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Page 208

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

oysters or the property of his old friends the snails. ' In a rainy year, there are more snails in a space of thirty miles than there are men in the whole earth,' and this being so, the deposits in Touraine and elsewhere can be easily accounted for. Then he argues that the shells were engendered spontaneously in the earth, ` and grew just as stones do.' A correspondent of his, a gentleman who had property near Chinon, had actually watched empty shells growing ; twice in eighty years a heavy crop had been produced, they were microscopic at first, and gradually swelled and stuck against one another until they formed a soft stone, suitable for building ; there were five or six species of these empty shells, and since the tenants and neighbours of the gentleman had seen them too, doubt was impossible. Indeed, we can all of us watch the process for ourselves, for the reason that the so-called Ammonite fossils vary in size : the curves of their spirals must obviously increase the longer they lie in the earth. And, finally, let us grant, for the sake of argument, that all the above arguments are false, and that the shells which have given such support to superstition really did originate in the sea. No matter-all is not lost : they can still be accounted for in three ways. Firstly, since so many of them are cockles, they may have dropped from the hats of Palmers who were going to the shrine of St. James at Compostella in the Middle Ages. Secondly, since so many are edible, they may be the debris of picnic parties. And thirdly, since so many of them are different, they may have come from the collections of dead conchologists. To this last argument-which leaves us almost more breathless than its companions-Voltaire returns more than once. He was vexed by the bones of a reindeer and of a hippopotamus which were found near Etampes. 'Are we to conclude from this,' he asks,' that the Nile and Lapland once shared the OrleansParis road ? ' Surely, it is simpler to suppose that the bones once adorned the cabinet of a connoisseur!
His anxiety over shells led him even further than we should expect. He feared that if once a flood was admitted Noah's ark would come sailing in, and consequently had to ridicule all theories of the universe that emphasized water. There was the fish Oannes, who came out of the Euphrates to preach to the Babylonians. There was Thales, who thought that the stars

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE oysters or what is property of his old friends what is snails. ' In a rainy year, there are more snails in a space of thirty miles than there are men in what is whole earth,' and this being so, what is deposits in Touraine and elsewhere can be easily accounted for. Then he argues that what is shells were engendered spontaneously in what is earth, ` and grew just as stones do.' A correspondent of his, a gentleman who had property near Chinon, had actually watched empty shells growing ; twice in eighty years a heavy crop had been produced, they were microscopic at first, and gradually swelled and stuck against one another until they formed a soft stone, suitable for building ; there were five or six species of these empty shells, and since what is tenants and neighbours of what is gentleman had seen them too, doubt was impossible. Indeed, we can all of us watch what is process for ourselves, for what is reason that what is so-called where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 208 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" oysters or what is property of his old friends the snails. ' In a rainy year, there are more snails in a space of thirty miles than there are men in what is whole earth,' and this being so, what is deposits in Touraine and elsewhere can be easily accounted for. Then he argues that what is shells were engendered spontaneously in what is earth, ` and grew just as stones do.' A correspondent of his, a gentleman who had property near Chinon, had actually watched empty shells growing ; twice in eighty years a heavy crop had been produced, they were microscopic at first, and gradually swelled and stuck against one another until they formed a soft stone, suitable for building ; there were five or six species of these empty shells, and since what is tenants and neighbours of what is gentleman had seen them too, doubt was impossible. Indeed, we can all of us watch what is process for ourselves, for what is reason that what is so-called Ammonite fossils vary in size : what is curves of their spirals must obviously increase what is longer they lie in what is earth. And, finally, let us grant, for what is sake of argument, that all what is above arguments are false, and that what is shells which have given such support to superstition really did originate in what is sea. No matter-all is not lost : they can still be accounted for in three ways. Firstly, since so many of them are cockles, they may have dropped from what is hats of Palmers who were going to what is shrine of St. James at Compostella in the Middle Ages. Secondly, since so many are edible, they may be the debris of picnic parties. And thirdly, since so many of them are different, they may have come from what is collections of dead conchologists. To this last argument-which leaves us almost more breathless than its companions-Voltaire returns more than once. He was vexed by what is bones of a reindeer and of a hippopotamus which were found near Etampes. 'Are we to conclude from this,' he asks,' that the Nile and Lapland once shared what is OrleansParis road ? ' Surely, it is simpler to suppose that what is bones once adorned what is cabinet of a connoisseur! His anxiety over shells led him even further than we should expect. He feared that if once a flood was admitted Noah's ark would come sailing in, and consequently had to ridicule all theories of the universe that emphasized water. There was what is fish Oannes, who came out of what is Euphrates to preach to what is Babylonians. There was Thales, who thought that what is stars where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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