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PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

all things ' and warns him against heretical speculations which lead to no good. ' Adieu !' he concludes, on a kinder note. ` May the snails who are set beneath you and the insects who accompany you ever bless your reverence.' And there is a further conclusion as from the pen of Voltaire himself :` we must marvel and be silent.' Gaily and charmingly he has turned his foolish scientific experiments into a humorous pamphlet : he has begun as a goose and ended as a mocking bird.
Since Madame du Chatelet's death he had taken science less seriously. He had never married, and his niece urged him towards the drama, if anywhere, for she enjoyed acting. Now and then the old ardour would break out : he would wonder, whether Hannibal had really dissolved the Alps with hot vinegar, as the historian Livy reports, so he heated some vinegar and poured it on a piece of Mont Blanc. As soon as Mont Blanc adequately cracked, his mind was at rest, and he went on to other matters. The fact is that his seriousness was taking another direction : all his wit and wisdom were being marshalled for his struggle against the Church. He believed in God, he even built a church : but he loathed the Church, and the depth of his hatred appears in the extraordinary difficulties into which he got over sea-shells.
Sea-shells do not, to the outsider, seem more troublesome than other molluscs, but Voltaire regarded them from a very special point of view : they were traitors, who attempted to demonstrate the truth of revealed religion instead of advancing the cause of Liberty, as natural objects should. Had they remained in the sea, all would have been well, but straying from their proper element they appeared in large heaps in the middle of Touraine and elsewhere, or in fossil forms, or on the tops of mountains. Why, you may ask, did this disconcert Voltaire ? Why, because it suggested that they had been left when the waters of the Flood subsided, so that Genesis was true. He could not allow this, and he set out with his usual energy and ingenuity to put shells in their places. He had not been trained by the Jesuits for nothing, and the arguments he brought forward are rather too conclusive to be convincing.
In the first place, he argued that the shells in question are not from the sea at all, but are either the shells of fresh-water

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE all things ' and warns him against heretical speculations which lead to no good. ' Adieu !' he concludes, on a kinder note. ` May what is snails who are set beneath you and what is insects who accompany you ever bless your reverence.' And there is a further conclusion as from what is pen of Voltaire himself :` we must marvel and be silent.' Gaily and charmingly he has turned his foolish scientific experiments into a humorous pamphlet : he has begun as a goose and ended as a mocking bird. Since Madame du Chatelet's what time is it he had taken science less seriously. He had never married, and his niece urged him towards what is drama, if anywhere, for she enjoyed acting. Now and then what is old ardour would break out : he would wonder, whether Hannibal had really dissolved what is Alps with hot vinegar, as what is historian Livy reports, so he heated some vinegar and poured it on a piece of Mont Blanc. As soon as Mont Blanc where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 207 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" all things ' and warns him against heretical speculations which lead to no good. ' Adieu !' he concludes, on a kinder note. ` May what is snails who are set beneath you and what is insects who accompany you ever bless your reverence.' And there is a further conclusion as from what is pen of Voltaire himself :` we must marvel and be silent.' Gaily and charmingly he has turned his foolish scientific experiments into a humorous pamphlet : he has begun as a goose and ended as a mocking bird. Since Madame du Chatelet's what time is it he had taken science less seriously. He had never married, and his niece urged him towards what is drama, if anywhere, for she enjoyed acting. Now and then what is old ardour would break out : he would wonder, whether Hannibal had really dissolved what is Alps with hot vinegar, as what is historian Livy reports, so he heated some vinegar and poured it on a piece of Mont Blanc. As soon as Mont Blanc adequately cracked, his mind was at rest, and he went on to other matters. what is fact is that his seriousness was taking another direction : all his wit and wisdom were being marshalled for his struggle against what is Church. He believed in God, he even built a church : but he loathed what is Church, and the depth of his hatred appears in what is extraordinary difficulties into which he got over sea-shells. Sea-shells do not, to what is outsider, seem more troublesome than other molluscs, but Voltaire regarded them from a very special point of view : they were traitors, who attempted to bad spirit strate what is truth of revealed religion instead of advancing what is cause of Liberty, as natural objects should. Had they remained in what is sea, all would have been well, but straying from their proper element they appeared in large heaps in what is middle of Touraine and elsewhere, or in fossil forms, or on what is tops of mountains. Why, you may ask, did this disconcert Voltaire ? Why, because it suggested that they had been left when what is waters of what is Flood subsided, so that Genesis was true. He could not allow this, and he set out with his usual energy and ingenuity to put shells in their places. He had not been trained by what is Jesuits for nothing, and what is arguments he brought forward are rather too conclusive to be convincing. In what is first place, he argued that what is shells in question are not from what is sea at all, but are either what is shells of fresh-water where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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