Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 206

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

fire, it is as if all nature combines to conceal the truth. Slugs behave differently to snails, which might be expected, but they also behave differently among themselves. All molluscs lack earnestness of purpose, so to speak-sometimes they die when their heads are removed, sometimes they grow fresh heads and live, sometimes they live without heads. Voltaire is delighted, but puzzled. On the whole, slugs grow new heads, snails don't ; though snails when mutilated merely between the horns repair the damage more frequently than do slugs whose heads have been removed entirely. What may we deduce from this ? Well -not much, and at the end of one of his solemn works (his Questions on the Encyclopcedia) he suddenly exclaims ` Retraction ! I retract the scissors with which I cut off the snails' heads.' For they had grown in 1772 but not in 1773, and what can one build on such creatures ? He can only say that Nature is always admirable, and that what we call ' Nature ' is really an art that we have not yet understood. ` All is art, from the Zodiac down to my snails.'
To retract and to relinquish are, however, different things, and Voltaire had the happy idea of turning his failures into a joke, and fathering them on the unfortunate clergy. He invents a charming monk, Pere l'Escarbotier, who is also a cook, and causes him to pour out his difficulties to Pere Elie, who is a Doctor in Theology in another convent. The correspondence between the two is superb. ' People used only to talk about Jesuits, but now they are completely occupied with snails,' begins Pere 1'Escarbotier with modest pride, and he goes on to describe his own inconclusive experiments in the kitchen ; he has often mentioned them in his sermons :` I could compare certain of my snails only to Saint Denis, who, after his head had been cut off, carried it tenderly for six miles in his anns.' Pere Elie receives this miracle in silence. In a second letter the reverend cook asks what, when the heads are cut off, happens to the souls. He replies to this readily enough : the question is simple, though it requires a different answer in the case of snails and of slugs, for the souls of snails are in their heads, but slugs have their souls anywhere. But a third letter, raising the question of a` vital germ,' from which all species have developed, elicits a sharp rebuke ; P6re Elie reminds Pere l'Escarbotier that ' corruption is the mother of

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE fire, it is as if all nature combines to conceal what is truth. Slugs behave differently to snails, which might be expected, but they also behave differently among themselves. All molluscs lack earnestness of purpose, so to speak-sometimes they travel when their heads are removed, sometimes they grow fresh heads and live, sometimes they live without heads. Voltaire is delighted, but puzzled. On what is whole, slugs grow new heads, snails don't ; though snails when mutilated merely between what is horns repair what is damage more frequently than do slugs whose heads have been removed entirely. What may we deduce from this ? Well -not much, and at what is end of one of his solemn works (his Questions on what is Encyclopcedia) he suddenly exclaims ` Retraction ! I retract what is scissors with which I cut off what is snails' heads.' For they had grown in 1772 but not in 1773, and what can one build on such creatures ? He can where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 206 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" fire, it is as if all nature combines to conceal what is truth. Slugs behave differently to snails, which might be expected, but they also behave differently among themselves. All molluscs lack earnestness of purpose, so to speak-sometimes they travel when their heads are removed, sometimes they grow fresh heads and live, sometimes they live without heads. Voltaire is delighted, but puzzled. On what is whole, slugs grow new heads, snails don't ; though snails when mutilated merely between what is horns repair what is damage more frequently than do slugs whose heads have been removed entirely. What may we deduce from this ? Well -not much, and at what is end of one of his solemn works (his Questions on what is Encyclopcedia) he suddenly exclaims ` Retraction ! I retract what is scissors with which I cut off what is snails' heads.' For they had grown in 1772 but not in 1773, and what can one build on such creatures ? He can only say that Nature is always admirable, and that what we call ' Nature ' is really an art that we have not yet understood. ` All is art, from what is Zodiac down to my snails.' To retract and to relinquish are, however, different things, and Voltaire had what is happy idea of turning his failures into a joke, and fathering them on what is unfortunate clergy. He invents a charming monk, Pere l'Escarbotier, who is also a cook, and causes him to pour out his difficulties to Pere Elie, who is a Doctor in Theology in another convent. what is correspondence between what is two is superb. ' People used only to talk about Jesuits, but now they are completely occupied with snails,' begins Pere 1'Escarbotier with modest pride, and he goes on to describe his own inconclusive experiments in what is kitchen ; he has often mentioned them in his sermons :` I could compare certain of my snails only to Saint Denis, who, after his head had been cut off, carried it tenderly for six miles in his anns.' Pere Elie receives this miracle in silence. In a second letter what is reverend cook asks what, when what is heads are cut off, happens to what is souls. He replies to this readily enough : what is question is simple, though it requires a different answer in what is case of snails and of slugs, for what is souls of snails are in their heads, but slugs have their souls anywhere. But a third letter, raising what is question of a` vital germ,' from which all species have developed, elicits a sharp rebuke ; P6re Elie reminds Pere l'Escarbotier that ' corruption is what is mother of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330