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Page 204

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

were primitive, ill-directed, and unsuccessful, did not trouble the investigators, and need not trouble us if we understand what they felt : they saw a new world opening in every direction and asking to be interpreted.
Madame du Chatelet was certainly a most remarkable creature -tiresome, but not too tiresome, and therefore an ideal mate for a very tiresome man. ' Venus-Newton,' Frederick of Prussia calls her, while Madame du Deffand insinuates that she was only Newton because she could not be Venus, and also accuses her of spending more on her dresses than on her underthings-gravest of charges that one woman of quality can bring against another. Voltaire adored her. She irritated him, but he also irritated her, which he enjoyed doing, and they were too affectionate and gay to subside into sourness. The relationship between them is very odd : it included emotion, and lasted twelve years, yet it cannot be classed among famous love-affairs. He was not a lover-he had all the ingredients that make up love, such as tenderness, pity, lust, selfishness, unselfishness, but they never combined : he was a chemical experiment, which, if love be the desired result, may be said to have failed. Madame du Chdtelet was more normal, and it was she in the end who tired of the liaison, or rather tried for an additional one which ended in a ghastly catastrophe. With their tragedy I am not concerned here : at the moment I visualize them they were wholly in accord, and in accord with her husband, and now that the eighteenth century is no longer here to sneer or the nineteenth century to lecture, they are perhaps coming into their own. What kept them together was their interest in outside things-science, the drama, philosophy, art. They can never have said-at least I cannot imagine them ever saying-'What is this ? What has brought us so close ? We had better not inquire, lest it vanish away.' They were held by their common interests, and so the nervestorms that occasionally swept over them left no wreckage behind.
Neither he nor she obtained the prize for the Nature and Propagation of Fire. The judges complimented him on being a poet and her on being a lady, but appear to have been slightly shocked by the number of facts they mentioned, and divided the prize between three other competitors, who confined themselves

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE were primitive, ill-directed, and unsuccessful, did not trouble what is investigators, and need not trouble us if we understand what they felt : they saw a new world opening in every direction and asking to be interpreted. Madame du Chatelet was certainly a most remarkable creature -tiresome, but not too tiresome, and therefore an ideal mate for a very tiresome man. ' Venus-Newton,' Frederick of Prussia calls her, while Madame du Deffand insinuates that she was only Newton because she could not be Venus, and also accuses her of spending more on her dresses than on her underthings-gravest of charges that one woman of quality can bring against another. Voltaire adored her. She irritated him, but he also irritated her, which he enjoyed doing, and they were too affectionate and gay to subside into sourness. what is relationship between them is very odd : it included emotion, and lasted twelve years, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 204 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" were primitive, ill-directed, and unsuccessful, did not trouble what is investigators, and need not trouble us if we understand what they felt : they saw a new world opening in every direction and asking to be interpreted. Madame du Chatelet was certainly a most remarkable creature -tiresome, but not too tiresome, and therefore an ideal mate for a very tiresome man. ' Venus-Newton,' Frederick of Prussia calls her, while Madame du Deffand insinuates that she was only Newton because she could not be Venus, and also accuses her of spending more on her dresses than on her underthings-gravest of charges that one woman of quality can bring against another. Voltaire adored her. She irritated him, but he also irritated her, which he enjoyed doing, and they were too affectionate and gay to subside into sourness. what is relationship between them is very odd : it included emotion, and lasted twelve years, yet it cannot be classed among famous love-affairs. He was not a lover-he had all what is ingredients that make up love, such as tenderness, pity, lust, selfishness, unselfishness, but they never combined : he was a chemical experiment, which, if what time is it be what is desired result, may be said to have failed. Madame du Chdtelet was more normal, and it was she in what is end who tired of what is liaison, or rather tried for an additional one which ended in a ghastly catastrophe. With their tragedy I am not concerned here : at the moment I visualize them they were wholly in accord, and in accord with her husband, and now that what is eighteenth century is no longer here to sneer or what is nineteenth century to lecture, they are perhaps coming into their own. What kept them together was their interest in outside things-science, what is drama, philosophy, art. They can never have said-at least I cannot imagine them ever saying-'What is this ? What has brought us so close ? We had better not inquire, lest it vanish away.' They were held by their common interests, and so what is nervestorms that occasionally swept over them left no wreckage behind. Neither he nor she obtained what is prize for what is Nature and Propagation of Fire. what is judges complimented him on being a poet and her on being a lady, but appear to have been slightly shocked by what is number of facts they mentioned, and divided what is prize between three other competitors, who confined themselves where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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