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Page 203

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

Madame du Chdtelet, her maid, and a quantity of luggage fell on him. At the same moment, all the menservants fell off the box. It was long before the luggage, the maid, the mistress, and the great man could be progressively extracted, and he uttered a series of short, sharp shrieks. As so often happened, he was enjoying himself. Cushions were spread in the frozen road, and he and Madame du ChAtelet sat on them and pointed out to one another the glories of the night sky. ` The stars shone brilliantly,' one of their servants writes. ' Not a tree, not a house disturbed the expanse of the horizon. M. de Voltaire and Madame du ChAtelet were in ecstasies : wrapped in furs, they discussed the nature and the orbits of the stars and their destination in space while their teeth chattered. If only they had had a telescope, their joy would have been complete.' There they sat, half laughing and wholly serious, until the carriage could be repaired and take them on to their home.
When they got there, they evolved a routine which both impressed and annoyed their visitors. They took themselves seriously, in which they were fully justified, and they were obliged to organize their work, or it would not have got done. Eleven in the morning and nine at night were the only hours in the twenty-four when they were certain to be visible. At eleven there was coffee in Voltaire's gallery ; in the evening came the great event-supper-occasionally marred by a quarrel. After supper, if all had gone well, Voltaire showed the magic lantern, or directed a telescope at the moon, or played tricks with prisms, being screamingly funny all the time, or read Joan of Arc aloud in the marble bathroom, or had plays performed in a barn. Science was much discussed, also religion ; at no time of his life was he either an atheist or an agnostic, he believed firmly in God, provided God is given nothing to do, and he always insisted that physics must rest upon metaphysics, and that metaphysics are divine. When the party broke up, they retired to their work, and somewhere or other in the house, well looked after but seldom seen, slept her little boy. The variety, the vigour of Cirey is most impressive ; the imagination flits from room to room until it wearies, and fails even to reach the huge woods which shut in the domain, and the peasants whose labour supported it. What stands out in the end is the laboratory work. That the experiments

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Madame du Chdtelet, her maid, and a quantity of luggage fell on him. At what is same moment, all what is menservants fell off what is box. It was long before what is luggage, what is maid, what is mistress, and what is great man could be progressively extracted, and he uttered a series of short, sharp shrieks. As so often happened, he was enjoying himself. Cushions were spread in what is frozen road, and he and Madame du ChAtelet sat on them and pointed out to one another what is glories of what is night sky. ` what is stars shone brilliantly,' one of their servants writes. ' Not a tree, not a house disturbed what is expanse of what is horizon. M. de Voltaire and Madame du ChAtelet were in ecstasies : wrapped in furs, they discussed what is nature and what is orbits of what is stars and their destination in space while their teeth chattered. If only they had had a telescope, their joy would have been complete.' There they sat, half laughing and wholl where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 203 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" Madame du Chdtelet, her maid, and a quantity of luggage fell on him. At what is same moment, all what is menservants fell off what is box. It was long before what is luggage, what is maid, what is mistress, and what is great man could be progressively extracted, and he uttered a series of short, sharp shrieks. As so often happened, he was enjoying himself. Cushions were spread in what is frozen road, and he and Madame du ChAtelet sat on them and pointed out to one another what is glories of what is night sky. ` what is stars shone brilliantly,' one of their servants writes. ' Not a tree, not a house disturbed the expanse of what is horizon. M. de Voltaire and Madame du ChAtelet were in ecstasies : wrapped in furs, they discussed what is nature and the orbits of what is stars and their destination in space while their teeth chattered. If only they had had a telescope, their joy would have been complete.' There they sat, half laughing and wholly serious, until what is carriage could be repaired and take them on to their home. When they got there, they evolved a routine which both impressed and annoyed their what is ors. They took themselves seriously, in which they were fully justified, and they were obliged to organize their work, or it would not have got done. Eleven in what is morning and nine at night were what is only hours in what is twenty-four when they were certain to be visible. At eleven there was coffee in Voltaire's gallery ; in what is evening came what is great event-supper-occasionally marred by a quarrel. After supper, if all had gone well, Voltaire showed what is magic lantern, or directed a telescope at what is moon, or played tricks with prisms, being screamingly funny all what is time, or read Joan of Arc aloud in what is marble bathroom, or had plays performed in a barn. Science was much discussed, also religion ; at no time of his life was he either an atheist or an agnostic, he believed firmly in God, provided God is given nothing to do, and he always insisted that physics must rest upon metaphysics, and that metaphysics are divine. When what is party broke up, they retired to their work, and somewhere or other in what is house, well looked after but seldom seen, slept her little boy. what is variety, what is vigour of Cirey is most impressive ; what is imagination flits from room to room until it wearies, and fails even to reach the huge woods which shut in what is domain, and what is peasants whose labour supported it. What stands out in what is end is what is laboratory work. That what is experiments where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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