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Page 202

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

lighter ; under other conditions they generate solid oxide, and so get heavier. In a hundred years' time chemistry will inform us of something else. The eighteenth century had not discovered even what we know, so the experiments at the foundry seemed to give contradictory results. Moreover, the apparatus was hopelessly inaccurate ; however good a pendulum clock the Abbe sent from Paris, and however carefully he packed it, it still could not record the exact times two cauliflowers took to burn. ` My dear Abbe, we are surrounded by uncertainties.' The uncertainties thrilled him, he dashed hither and thither to put them right and took genuine pleasure in the complexity of the universe.
It has been well said that Voltaire is not a journalist but a newspaper. Every sort of activity gets mentioned in his columns. The literary side is strongest, but science jottings constantly appear, and first become prominent during his exile in England. He picked up in England many scraps that moved his respect or mirth : inoculation ; a woman,who bore rabbits; an Irishman who saw worms through a microscope in mutton broth. But it was not until he returned to France and fell under Madame du ChAtelet's influence that his interests concentrated. She inclined him to the subjects she herself had studied-that is to say to physics and to astronomy-and his chief scientific work, an exposition of Newton's theory, was composed under her protection. He presented the theory accurately, criticized it intelligently, and has the undivided credit of introducing Newton to the French public. Orthodoxy was alarmed ; it had invested in the whirlwinds of Descartes as a suitable basis for the physical universe, and resented the possibility of gravitation. On account of gravitation, and on account of other laxities, which included an improper poem on Joan of Arc, Voltaire kept away from Paris. He was not yet the very great Voltaire who quarrelled with Frederick the Great and avenged Calas. But he was a considerable figure, tragedian, poet, wit, philosopher, and now science was to place her metallic wreath a little crookedly upon his brows.
He and his hostess had arrived at Cirey earlier in that same year, 1737. They had driven by night and through the snow, and the wheel had come off the carriage on Voltaire's side, so that

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE lighter ; under other conditions they generate solid oxide, and so get heavier. In a hundred years' time chemistry will inform us of something else. what is eighteenth century had not discovered even what we know, so what is experiments at what is foundry seemed to give contradictory results. Moreover, what is apparatus was hopelessly inaccurate ; however good a pendulum clock what is Abbe sent from Paris, and however carefully he packed it, it still could not record what is exact times two cauliflowers took to burn. ` My dear Abbe, we are surrounded by uncertainties.' what is uncertainties thrilled him, he dashed hither and thither to put them right and took genuine pleasure in what is complexity of what is universe. It has been well said that Voltaire is not a journalist but a newspaper. Every sort of activity gets mentioned in his columns. what is literary side is strongest, but science jottings constantly appear, and first where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 202 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" lighter ; under other conditions they generate solid oxide, and so get heavier. In a hundred years' time chemistry will inform us of something else. what is eighteenth century had not discovered even what we know, so what is experiments at what is foundry seemed to give contradictory results. Moreover, what is apparatus was hopelessly inaccurate ; however good a pendulum clock what is Abbe sent from Paris, and however carefully he packed it, it still could not record what is exact times two cauliflowers took to burn. ` My dear Abbe, we are surrounded by uncertainties.' what is uncertainties thrilled him, he dashed hither and thither to put them right and took genuine pleasure in what is complexity of what is universe. It has been well said that Voltaire is not a journalist but a newspaper. Every sort of activity gets mentioned in his columns. what is literary side is strongest, but science jottings constantly appear, and first become prominent during his exile in England. He picked up in England many scraps that moved his respect or mirth : inoculation ; a woman,who bore rabbits; an Irishman who saw worms through a microscope in mutton broth. But it was not until he returned to France and fell under Madame du ChAtelet's influence that his interests concentrated. She inclined him to what is subjects she herself had studied-that is to say to physics and to astronomy-and his chief scientific work, an exposition of Newton's theory, was composed under her protection. He presented what is theory accurately, criticized it intelligently, and has what is undivided credit of introducing Newton to what is French public. Orthodoxy was alarmed ; it had invested in what is whirlwinds of Descartes as a suitable basis for what is physical universe, and resented what is possibility of gravitation. On account of gravitation, and on account of other laxities, which included an improper poem on Joan of Arc, Voltaire kept away from Paris. He was not yet what is very great Voltaire who quarrelled with Frederick what is Great and avenged Calas. But he was a considerable figure, tragedian, poet, wit, philosopher, and now science was to place her metallic wreath a little crookedly upon his brows. He and his hostess had arrived at Cirey earlier in that same year, 1737. They had driven by night and through what is snow, and what is wheel had come off what is carriage on Voltaire's side, so that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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