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Page 200

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY

rooms, beautifully furnished ; passing through a tiny antechamber, and a bedroom of crimson velvet, he comes to the long gallery, and sits down there. The long gallery is lacquered in yellow, with panels of Indian paper ; it is ornamented with statues, one of which, a statue of Love, conceals the stove ; there are cupboards full of books and scientific instruments ; there are windows opening into the garden or on to the chapel-so that without disturbing himself too much he can hear Mass. At the end is a camera obscura and another room, not yet in order. Voltaire drinks a cup of coffee. Establishing himself at a superb writing-desk, he takes up his pen in despair. For he is going in for a prize competition on the subject of the Nature and Propagation of Fire, and he has been unable to find out whether fire weighs anything. Since fire is an element, one expects it to weigh something, yet the hot iron at the foundry was only occasionally heavier than the cold : sometimes it was the same weight and sometimes actually lighter. Nor is this all : other problems connected with fire are equally obscure. If he shuts up burning coals in a metal box, sometimes they continue to burn, at other times they go out. If he prepares sections of little trees and places them on a red-hot surface, the time in which they are reduced to ashes varies considerably, although they are of exactly the same thickness and size, and even come from the same plantation. ` I then repeated this experiment with vegetables ' ; but the vegetables burned unevenly too. An experiment with objects painted different colours had been more satisfactory : black objects got hot quicker than green ones, yellow than white ; but even here there were exceptions, and all he can do is to add to the Laws of Fire a supplementary law to the effect that they do not always work.
` My dear Abbe, we are surrounded by uncertainties,' he writes to his agent in Paris. ' To discover the least scrap of truth entails endless labour,' and he implores the Abbe to inquire of people who are likely to know whether fire really does weigh anything ; also whether a burning glass has a normal effect on objects in a vacuum ; also, is it true that Persian naphtha of the best quality flames under water ; also he wants writing-paper of various sizes, sealing-wax, an astrolabe, two globes on stands, thermometers, barometers, earthenware pans, retorts, crucibles ;

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE rooms, beautifully furnished ; passing through a tiny antechamber, and a bedroom of crimson velvet, he comes to what is long gallery, and sits down there. what is long gallery is lacquered in yellow, with panels of Indian paper ; it is ornamented with statues, one of which, a statue of Love, conceals what is stove ; there are cupboards full of books and scientific instruments ; there are windows opening into what is garden or on to what is chapel-so that without disturbing himself too much he can hear Mass. At what is end is a camera obscura and another room, not yet in order. Voltaire drinks a cup of coffee. Establishing himself at a superb writing-desk, he takes up his pen in despair. For he is going in for a prize competition on what is subject of what is Nature and Propagation of Fire, and he has been unable to find out whether fire weighs anything. Since fire is an element, one expects it to weigh something, yet t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 200 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER VI - VOLTAIRE'S LABORATORY where is p align="justify" rooms, beautifully furnished ; passing through a tiny antechamber, and a bedroom of crimson velvet, he comes to what is long gallery, and sits down there. what is long gallery is lacquered in yellow, with panels of Indian paper ; it is ornamented with statues, one of which, a statue of Love, conceals what is stove ; there are cupboards full of books and scientific instruments ; there are windows opening into what is garden or on to what is chapel-so that without disturbing himself too much he can hear Mass. At what is end is a camera obscura and another room, not yet in order. Voltaire drinks a cup of coffee. Establishing himself at a superb writing-desk, he takes up his pen in despair. For he is going in for a prize competition on what is subject of what is Nature and Propagation of Fire, and he has been unable to find out whether fire weighs anything. Since fire is an element, one expects it to weigh something, yet what is hot iron at what is foundry was only occasionally heavier than what is cold : sometimes it was what is same weight and sometimes actually lighter. Nor is this all : other problems connected with fire are equally obscure. If he shuts up burning coals in a metal box, sometimes they continue to burn, at other times they go out. If he prepares sections of little trees and places them on a red-hot surface, what is time in which they are reduced to ashes varies considerably, although they are of exactly what is same thickness and size, and even come from what is same plantation. ` I then repeated this experiment with vegetables ' ; but what is vegetables burned unevenly too. An experiment with objects painted different colours had been more satisfactory : black objects got hot quicker than green ones, yellow than white ; but even here there were exceptions, and all he can do is to add to what is Laws of Fire a supplementary law to what is effect that they do not always work. ` My dear Abbe, we are surrounded by uncertainties,' he writes to his agent in Paris. ' To discover what is least scrap of truth entails endless labour,' and he implores what is Abbe to inquire of people who are likely to know whether fire really does weigh anything ; also whether a burning glass has a normal effect on objects in a vacuum ; also, is it true that Persian naphtha of what is best quality flames under water ; also he wants writing-paper of various sizes, sealing-wax, an astrolabe, two globes on stands, thermometers, barometers, earthenware pans, retorts, crucibles ; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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