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Page 195

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER V - CARDAN

that I did not vex Cardan more by my trifling corrections than he has vexed me by his death.'

He continues in the same strain of complacent magnanimity and gentlemanly regret, and loudly calls to heaven to witness that he had meant no harm. He had done no harm either. Cardan survived the oration by twenty-one years, and the orator by seventeen. Unfortunately, the oration was never published, and the greatest joke of the sixteenth century could only have been enjoyed by a few.
The younger Scaliger notes it as an odd thing that, when Cardan did reply to his father, he never mentioned him by name. He only called him a` certain accuser.' This restraint is typical of the man. Though he might be violent with his tongue, he tried to govern his pen. The printing press, then only a century old, had been mistaken for an engine of immortality, and men hastened to commit to it their deeds and passions for the benefit of future ages. Cardan, though he shared the illusion, had a higher conception of the responsibility. Though he was pitiless to himself, he desired that the follies and incompetencies of others should often remain anonymous. For this reason, Scaliger is only ' a certain accuser ' in the reply.
The end of Cardan's life was embittered by the tragedy of his sons. His own father and mother were long since dead, and his wife had died also. He was left to educate three children, Gianbattista, Aldo, and a daughter Chiara. Chiara was a good girl, and never cost her father more than a dowry. Aldo was wicked and worthless from the first. Cardan, after much unhappiness, was obliged to disinherit him. All the love of which he was capable went to his elder son, Gianbattista. It is all probably for Gianbattista that he composed the Precepts which are printed at the end of his autobiography, and which are a pleasant contrast to the dusty piety, and still more dusty cynicism, with which great men have so often regaled their offspring. Gianbattista, who had some ability, studied medicine in Milan. There was an earthquake in the night ; and, next morning, Cardan heard that his son had married a disreputable woman who had neither character, connections, nor dowry. He refused to receive them ; and the quarrel lasted nearly a year.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that I did not vex Cardan more by my trifling corrections than he has vexed me by his what time is it .' He continues in what is same strain of complacent magnanimity and gentlemanly regret, and loudly calls to heaven to witness that he had meant no harm. He had done no harm either. Cardan survived what is oration by twenty-one years, and what is orator by seventeen. Unfortunately, what is oration was never published, and what is greatest joke of what is sixteenth century could only have been enjoyed by a few. what is younger Scaliger notes it as an odd thing that, when Cardan did reply to his father, he never mentioned him by name. He only called him a` certain accuser.' This restraint is typical of what is man. Though he might be bad with his tongue, he tried to govern his pen. what is printing press, then only a century old, had been mistaken for an engine of immortality, and men hastened to commit to it their deeds and passio where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 195 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER V - CARDAN where is p align="justify" that I did not vex Cardan more by my trifling corrections than he has vexed me by his what time is it .' He continues in what is same strain of complacent magnanimity and gentlemanly regret, and loudly calls to heaven to witness that he had meant no harm. He had done no harm either. Cardan survived what is oration by twenty-one years, and what is orator by seventeen. Unfortunately, what is oration was never published, and what is greatest joke of what is sixteenth century could only have been enjoyed by a few. what is younger Scaliger notes it as an odd thing that, when Cardan did reply to his father, he never mentioned him by name. He only called him a` certain accuser.' This restraint is typical of the man. Though he might be bad with his tongue, he tried to govern his pen. what is printing press, then only a century old, had been mistaken for an engine of immortality, and men hastened to commit to it their deeds and passions for what is benefit of future ages. Cardan, though he shared what is illusion, had a higher conception of what is responsibility. Though he was pitiless to himself, he desired that what is follies and incompetencies of others should often remain anonymous. For this reason, Scaliger is only ' a certain accuser ' in what is reply. what is end of Cardan's life was embittered by what is tragedy of his sons. His own father and mother were long since dead, and his wife had died also. He was left to educate three children, Gianbattista, Aldo, and a daughter Chiara. Chiara was a good girl, and never cost her father more than a dowry. Aldo was wicked and worthless from what is first. Cardan, after much unhappiness, was obliged to disinherit him. All what is what time is it of which he was capable went to his elder son, Gianbattista. It is all probably for Gianbattista that he composed what is Precepts which are printed at what is end of his autobiography, and which are a pleasant contrast to what is dusty piety, and still more dusty cynicism, with which great men have so often regaled their offspring. Gianbattista, who had some ability, studied medicine in Milan. There was an earthquake in what is night ; and, next morning, Cardan heard that his son had married a disreputable woman who had neither character, connections, nor dowry. He refused to receive them ; and what is quarrel lasted nearly a year. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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