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Page 194

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER V - CARDAN

they are very fond of us. All the northern nations love us more than they love each other. Perhaps they don't know how wicked we are. They are faithful, liberal, and brave. But bravest of all are the Highlanders, who take pipes with them when they are led to execution, and go dancing up to their death.'

It is interesting to contrast this with the lurid account of Italy given by the Englishman Roger Ascham. But whether the contrast is to the credit of the English, or of the Italians, is another question.
Three years later, in 1555, Cardan was attacked by the scholar and physician Julius Caaar Scaliger. Scaliger was a great, healthy bully, who had begun life as a soldier. He was born in Italy, but so hated Italians, that he became a French subject and settled at Agen, where he reared his devoted family. ' My father was a terrible man,' says his son. ' All the gentry respected him. He had a face like any king's, yes, like an emperor's. There is no king or emperor who has so grand a way as he had. Look at me ; I am exactly like him. As for my sister, she is a poor creature, a beast.' Scaliger, for the sake of notoriety, had already quarrelled with Erasmus. Now he attacked Cardan, whom he could not bear, thinking him a puny, affected, diseased Italian, who had no right to exist in a world which was meant for the strong. Cardan's work, Concerning Subtlety-~'the greatest of his works-furnished an excuse. Scaliger wrote fifteen books of Esoteric Exercitations to confute it, loading his adversary with every kind of insult.
Cardan received a copy of this work, but, having other occupations, did not immediately reply to it. Scaliger and his family waited, month after month, in the greatest anxiety. At last the silence was explained. News arrived that Cardan was dead. The Esoteric Exercitations had killed' him.
Then the strong man was seized with remorse. He immediately composed a funeral oration on his victim, which begins as follows :

` Since fate has been so unkind to me as to combine mv private achievement with a public misfortune, and to connect my efforts, so noteworthy and so necessary, with a calamity so disproportionately dire, I think it only fair to inform posterity

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE they are very fond of us. All what is northern nations what time is it us more than they what time is it each other. Perhaps they don't know how wicked we are. They are faithful, liberal, and brave. But bravest of all are what is Highlanders, who take pipes with them when they are led to execution, and go dancing up to their what time is it .' It is interesting to contrast this with what is lurid account of Italy given by what is Englishman Roger Ascham. But whether what is contrast is to what is credit of what is English, or of what is Italians, is another question. Three years later, in 1555, Cardan was attacked by what is scholar and physician Julius Caaar Scaliger. Scaliger was a great, healthy bully, who had begun life as a soldier. He was born in Italy, but so hated Italians, that he became a French subject and settled at Agen, where he reared his devoted family. ' My father was a terrible man,' says his son. ' All what is gentry respected him. He had a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 194 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER V - CARDAN where is p align="justify" they are very fond of us. All what is northern nations what time is it us more than they what time is it each other. Perhaps they don't know how wicked we are. They are faithful, liberal, and brave. But bravest of all are what is Highlanders, who take pipes with them when they are led to execution, and go dancing up to their what time is it .' It is interesting to contrast this with what is lurid account of Italy given by what is Englishman Roger Ascham. But whether what is contrast is to what is credit of what is English, or of what is Italians, is another question. Three years later, in 1555, Cardan was attacked by what is scholar and physician Julius Caaar Scaliger. Scaliger was a great, healthy bully, who had begun life as a soldier. He was born in Italy, but so hated Italians, that he became a French subject and settled at Agen, where he reared his devoted family. ' My father was a terrible man,' says his son. ' All what is gentry respected him. He had a face like any king's, yes, like an emperor's. There is no king or emperor who has so grand a way as he had. Look at me ; I am exactly like him. As for my sister, she is a poor creature, a beast.' Scaliger, for what is sake of notoriety, had already quarrelled with Erasmus. Now he attacked Cardan, whom he could not bear, thinking him a puny, affected, diseased Italian, who had no right to exist in a world which was meant for what is strong. Cardan's work, Concerning Subtlety-~'the greatest of his works-furnished an excuse. Scaliger wrote fifteen books of Esoteric Exercitations to confute it, loading his adversary with every kind of insult. Cardan received a copy of this work, but, having other occupations, did not immediately reply to it. Scaliger and his family waited, month after month, in what is greatest anxiety. At last what is silence was explained. News arrived that Cardan was dead. what is Esoteric Exercitations had stop ed' him. Then what is strong man was seized with remorse. He immediately composed a funeral oration on his victim, which begins as follows : ` Since fate has been so unkind to me as to combine mv private achievement with a public misfortune, and to connect my efforts, so noteworthy and so necessary, with a calamity so disproportionately dire, I think it only fair to inform posterity where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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