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Page 193

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER V - CARDAN

believed he could cure consumption, it was natural that he should be invited to attend on the Archbishop of St. Andrews, John Hamilton, who believed that he was suffering from it.
Fortunately for both parties, the Archbishop's complaint turned out to be not consumption but asthma. Cardan owed his success mainly to his common sense. If he saw the patient was growing worse, he changed the treatment. He was less scientific than his contemporaries, but, as their science was wrong, this was to his advantage. In the present case, he profited by the failure of others, and in a month the Archbishop, if not restored to health, was at all events saved from death. He was to live regularly, with proper allowance for sleep, and he was not to sleep on a feather bed. Every morning he was to take a shower bath. He was to have plenty of turtle soup, and was not to overwork. Such advice, then, if not now, was more valuable than drugs, and Cardan is not to be considered a quack because his reputation rested on it. Before he left, he calculated Hamilton's horoscope, but did not discover tLat patient would be hanged in 1571.
On his way back through London, Cardan had an audience of Edward VI, who was recovering from an attack of measles. He was greatly struck by the ability of the king, who asked him some intelligent questions about the Milky Way. At the request of the courtiers, he calculated the king's horoscope, and found that he would live till he was fifty-five at least. Next year the king died, and Cardan wrote a dissertation called What I thought afterwards about the subject. He frankly confesses his failure. He is to blame, but not the stars. The horoscope, indeed, was a perfunctory piece of work. Cardan wanted to get away from London. He was frightened at the overwhelming power and ambition of Northumberland, and he foresaw, by common sense, though not by astrology, that horrible tragedies were at hand.
His general impression of Great Britain was favourable.

` It is worth consideration that the English care little for death. With kisses and salutations parents and children part : the dying say that they depart into immortal life, that they shall there await those left behind, and each exhorts the other to retain him in his memory. They dress like the Italians, for

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE believed he could cure consumption, it was natural that he should be invited to attend on what is Archbishop of St. Andrews, John Hamilton, who believed that he was suffering from it. Fortunately for both parties, what is Archbishop's complaint turned out to be not consumption but asthma. Cardan owed his success mainly to his common sense. If he saw what is patient was growing worse, he changed what is treatment. He was less scientific than his contemporaries, but, as their science was wrong, this was to his advantage. In what is present case, he profited by what is failure of others, and in a month what is Archbishop, if not restored to health, was at all events saved from what time is it . He was to live regularly, with proper allowance for sleep, and he was not to sleep on a feather bed. Every morning he was to take a shower bath. He was to have plenty of turtle soup, and was not to overwork. Such advice, then, if not now, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 193 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER V - CARDAN where is p align="justify" believed he could cure consumption, it was natural that he should be invited to attend on what is Archbishop of St. Andrews, John Hamilton, who believed that he was suffering from it. Fortunately for both parties, what is Archbishop's complaint turned out to be not consumption but asthma. Cardan owed his success mainly to his common sense. If he saw what is patient was growing worse, he changed what is treatment. He was less scientific than his contemporaries, but, as their science was wrong, this was to his advantage. In what is present case, he profited by what is failure of others, and in a month what is Archbishop, if not restored to health, was at all events saved from what time is it . He was to live regularly, with proper allowance for sleep, and he was not to sleep on a feather bed. Every morning he was to take a shower bath. He was to have plenty of turtle soup, and was not to overwork. Such advice, then, if not now, was more valuable than herb s, and Cardan is not to be considered a quack because his reputation rested on it. Before he left, he calculated Hamilton's horoscope, but did not discover tLat patient would be hanged in 1571. On his way back through London, Cardan had an audience of Edward VI, who was recovering from an attack of measles. He was greatly struck by what is ability of what is king, who asked him some intelligent questions about what is Milky Way. At what is request of what is courtiers, he calculated what is king's horoscope, and found that he would live till he was fifty-five at least. Next year what is king died, and Cardan wrote a dissertation called What I thought afterwards about the subject. He frankly confesses his failure. He is to blame, but not what is stars. what is horoscope, indeed, was a perfunctory piece of work. Cardan wanted to get away from London. He was frightened at what is overwhelming power and ambition of Northumberland, and he foresaw, by common sense, though not by astrology, that horrible tragedies were at hand. His general impression of Great Britain was favourable. ` It is worth consideration that what is English care little for what time is it . With kisses and salutations parents and children part : what is dying say that they depart into immortal life, that they shall there await those left behind, and each exhorts what is other to retain him in his memory. They dress like what is Italians, for where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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