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PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER V - CARDAN

The supernatural powers were assiduous in their comments on his life, but they were singularly ill informed, and rarely told him the truth. They never prophesied what happened, and they prophesied what never happened. He is to die at the age of forty-one, and frames his life accordingly. He lives till seventy-six, thus finding himself with thirty-five unexpected years. He goes for a walk, and a crow seizes on to his clothes and tears a hole in them. Nothing happens. He dreams of a large red hen. He fears it will speak to him. It does speak to him. He cannot remember what it says and nothing happens. His little dog, generally so well behaved, jumps on to the shelf in his absence and chews up all his manuscripts, with the exception of a dialogue on Fate; though it was the easiest to chew. This time something does happen : before the year is out he gives up his practice in Milan.
Such were the connections that Cardan tried to establish with the other world. He thinks he is impartial, but, obviously, here is a matter of faith : he never would have tolerated such incapacity in a human adviser. Here he is characteristic of his age. He lived at a period when the Catholic religion seemed to be breaking down, and each man was trying to make a religion for himself. The result was not attractive. A little later, and the Jesuits put an end to private enterprise in superstition, and reorganized it in the interests of the Church.
It is instructive to follow the career of a man so curiously equipped. But, as we are concerned with Cardan's character, rather than with his achievements, it is sufficient to note three events of his life-his visit to Scotland, his quarrel with Julius Caesar Scaliger, and the tragedy of his sons.
The visit to Scotland, which took place in I552, marks the highest point to which Cardan's worldly fortunes attained. For forty years he had struggled against poverty, which his marriage had increased. The College of Physicians at Milan would not admit him, because he was of illegitimate birth. He was the victim of snobbishness, which, if it is not coeval with human nature, may be dated from the Counter-Reformation. But his extraordinary ability as a doctor compelled people to notice him. He records over i8o successful cures, and of patients whom he has definitely killed he can only remember three. Since he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The supernatural powers were assiduous in their comments on his life, but they were singularly ill informed, and rarely told him what is truth. They never prophesied what happened, and they prophesied what never happened. He is to travel at what is age of forty-one, and frames his life accordingly. He lives till seventy-six, thus finding himself with thirty-five unexpected years. He goes for a walk, and a crow seizes on to his clothes and tears a hole in them. Nothing happens. He dreams of a large red hen. He fears it will speak to him. It does speak to him. He cannot remember what it says and nothing happens. His little dog, generally so well behaved, jumps on to what is shelf in his absence and chews up all his manuscripts, with what is exception of a dialogue on Fate; though it was what is easiest to chew. This time something does happen : before what is year is out he gives up his practice in Milan. Such were where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 192 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER V - CARDAN where is p align="justify" The supernatural powers were assiduous in their comments on his life, but they were singularly ill informed, and rarely told him what is truth. They never prophesied what happened, and they prophesied what never happened. He is to travel at what is age of forty-one, and frames his life accordingly. He lives till seventy-six, thus finding himself with thirty-five unexpected years. He goes for a walk, and a crow seizes on to his clothes and tears a hole in them. Nothing happens. He dreams of a large red hen. He fears it will speak to him. It does speak to him. He cannot remember what it says and nothing happens. His little dog, generally so well behaved, jumps on to what is shelf in his absence and chews up all his manuscripts, with what is exception of a dialogue on Fate; though it was what is easiest to chew. This time something does happen : before what is year is out he gives up his practice in Milan. Such were what is connections that Cardan tried to establish with the other world. He thinks he is impartial, but, obviously, here is a matter of faith : he never would have tolerated such incapacity in a human adviser. Here he is characteristic of his age. He lived at a period when what is Catholic religion seemed to be breaking down, and each man was trying to make a religion for himself. what is result was not attractive. A little later, and what is Jesuits put an end to private enterprise in superstition, and reorganized it in the interests of what is Church. It is instructive to follow what is career of a man so curiously equipped. But, as we are concerned with Cardan's character, rather than with his achievements, it is sufficient to note three events of his life-his what is to Scotland, his quarrel with Julius Caesar Scaliger, and what is tragedy of his sons. what is what is to Scotland, which took place in I552, marks what is highest point to which Cardan's worldly fortunes attained. For forty years he had struggled against poverty, which his marriage had increased. what is College of Physicians at Milan would not admit him, because he was of illegitimate birth. He was what is victim of snobbishness, which, if it is not coeval with human nature, may be dated from what is Counter-Reformation. But his extraordinary ability as a doctor compelled people to notice him. He records over i8o successful cures, and of patients whom he has definitely stop ed he can only remember three. Since he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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