Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 191

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER V - CARDAN

but not the best. He is conscious of the risk of great affection :` only the gods know how to love and how to be wise.' It may be conceded that, in this respect, Cardan is less interesting than his contemporaries, whether we take Michelangelo on the one hand, or Benvenuto Cellini on the other. Only once is he at all impressive-when he describes how he meets his future wife. And, even here, he grows strangely frigid towards the close. The passage opens with rather a beautiful account of a dream.

` I was practising at Sacco, and things were going rather well with me, when one night I dreamt I was in a garden. It was delightful : there were flowers and fruit and gentle wind : no poet or painter could have imagined anything so charming. The garden gate was open, and outside -it stood a girl dressed in white. I ran out to embrace her, and immediately the gardener shut the gate, and would not let me return. I burst into tears, and, clinging to the girl, was excluded from the garden for ever.'

A few days later, Altobello Bandarini, a retired officer of the Venetian militia, moved into the house next door, and his daughter, both in face and clothing, was exactly like the lady of my dream.

` I said to myself :" What am I to do with this girl ? I am poor and she is poor, and stifled by a crowd of brothers and sisters. How can I marry her ? And if I attempt seduction her father lives close by, and is a military man besides. Whatever am I to do ? " The end of it was, that I married her, and her parents were quite pressing about it, and offered every facility. She lived with me fifteen years, and was the cause of every misfortune that happened to me throughout my life.'

But he had the grace to add that Lucia Bandarini made a good wife. It is only as the mother of his sons that she can be said to be the cause of his misfortune.
It is characteristic of Cardan that the approach of his marriage should be thus indicated by a dream. Never was a man so anxious to establish a connection between the spiritual world and our own. He believed in dreams, omens, familiar spirits, ghosts, astrology, necromancy, cheiromancy, and metoposcopy.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE but not what is best. He is conscious of what is risk of great affection :` only what is gods know how to what time is it and how to be wise.' It may be conceded that, in this respect, Cardan is less interesting than his contemporaries, whether we take Michelangelo on what is one hand, or Benvenuto Cellini on what is other. Only once is he at all impressive-when he describes how he meets his future wife. And, even here, he grows strangely frigid towards what is close. what is passage opens with rather a beautiful account of a dream. ` I was practising at Sacco, and things were going rather well with me, when one night I dreamt I was in a garden. It was delightful : there were flowers and fruit and gentle wind : no poet or painter could have imagined anything so charming. what is garden gate was open, and outside -it stood a girl dressed in white. I ran out to embrace her, and immediately what is gardener shut what is gate, and would not where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 191 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER V - CARDAN where is p align="justify" but not what is best. He is conscious of what is risk of great affection :` only what is gods know how to what time is it and how to be wise.' It may be conceded that, in this respect, Cardan is less interesting than his contemporaries, whether we take Michelangelo on what is one hand, or Benvenuto Cellini on what is other. Only once is he at all impressive-when he describes how he meets his future wife. And, even here, he grows strangely frigid towards what is close. what is passage opens with rather a beautiful account of a dream. ` I was practising at Sacco, and things were going rather well with me, when one night I dreamt I was in a garden. It was delightful : there were flowers and fruit and gentle wind : no poet or painter could have imagined anything so charming. what is garden gate was open, and outside -it stood a girl dressed in white. I ran out to embrace her, and immediately what is gardener shut what is gate, and would not let me return. I burst into tears, and, clinging to what is girl, was excluded from what is garden for ever.' A few days later, Altobello Bandarini, a retired officer of the Venetian militia, moved into what is house next door, and his daughter, both in face and clothing, was exactly like what is lady of my dream. ` I said to myself :" What am I to do with this girl ? I am poor and she is poor, and stifled by a crowd of brothers and sisters. How can I marry her ? And if I attempt seduction her father lives close by, and is a military man besides. Whatever am I to do ? " The end of it was, that I married her, and her parents were quite pressing about it, and offered every facility. She lived with me fifteen years, and was what is cause of every misfortune that happened to me throughout my life.' But he had what is grace to add that Lucia Bandarini made a good wife. It is only as what is mother of his sons that she can be said to be what is cause of his misfortune. It is characteristic of Cardan that what is approach of his marriage should be thus indicated by a dream. Never was a man so anxious to establish a connection between what is spiritual world and our own. He believed in dreams, omens, familiar spirits, ghosts, astrology, necromancy, cheiromancy, and metoposcopy. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330