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Page 190

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER V - CARDAN

to the serenity of the maker. Occasionally he wished for death, but the wish did not last long, nor was it violent while it lasted. ` I think,' he adds, ` that others have wished for it also, though they have never had the courage to say so in a book.'
He is equally sincere over the defects of his character, though here the moralist may object that sincerity is not enough, and that a little shame would be very desirable. Cardan is so interested in self-analysis that he often forgets to deplore the results he has arrived at. He relates, in quick succession, his bad temper, his stupidity, his licentiousness, his inordinate love of revenge, without pausing to take breath and repent. Several times he had ruined himself by gambling : he sold all his wife's jewels, and the furniture, to pay his debts. But he can look back with pleasure on the days when he had luck and adds: ` Never play unless you play for money ; nothing else can excuse the waste of time.' When his vices are inconvenient to himself, we have a more decorous state of things. ' I wish I had a stronger character ; I ought to give the servants notice, and I can't. And I have allowed people to give me presents of goats, lambs, storks, hares and conies, till the house smells like a farmyard.' But sometimes, when we should most desire it, he is truly penitent : he cannot forgive himself for his habit of deliberately saying things that will vex his hearers : he has done it all his life : it is so strange, this sudden impulse to be rude and to inflict pain. Evidently Cardan had the desire to shock others which is so often found in unconventional people, and which is so often taken as a mark of unconventionality. But he had the head to know that it was wrong, and the heart to be sorry for it.
Such instances of tenderness are comparatively rare. To Cardan, the greatest things in life were work, self-examination, and the hope of immortality. Human intercourse was unimportant beside these. The only time he is stirred to great emotion is at the death of his son, and even here it is the feeling that his name will not survive on earth that pains him most. He regarded friends as useful aids to existence : he took care that Cardinals should be among them, and Senators, and the Imperial Viceroys of Milan. ' When you are choosing a friend, see first whether he gets on with others '-admirable advice,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to what is serenity of what is maker. Occasionally he wished for what time is it , but what is wish did not last long, nor was it bad while it lasted. ` I think,' he adds, ` that others have wished for it also, though they have never had what is courage to say so in a book.' He is equally sincere over what is defects of his character, though here what is moralist may object that sincerity is not enough, and that a little shame would be very desirable. Cardan is so interested in self-analysis that he often forgets to deplore what is results he has arrived at. He relates, in quick succession, his bad temper, his stupidity, his licentiousness, his inordinate what time is it of revenge, without pausing to take breath and repent. Several times he had ruined himself by gambling : he sold all his wife's jewels, and what is furniture, to pay his debts. But he can look back with pleasure on what is days when he had luck and adds: ` Never play unless where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 190 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER V - CARDAN where is p align="justify" to what is serenity of what is maker. Occasionally he wished for what time is it , but what is wish did not last long, nor was it bad while it lasted. ` I think,' he adds, ` that others have wished for it also, though they have never had what is courage to say so in a book.' He is equally sincere over what is defects of his character, though here what is moralist may object that sincerity is not enough, and that a little shame would be very desirable. Cardan is so interested in self-analysis that he often forgets to deplore what is results he has arrived at. He relates, in quick succession, his bad temper, his stupidity, his licentiousness, his inordinate what time is it of revenge, without pausing to take breath and repent. Several times he had ruined himself by gambling : he sold all his wife's jewels, and what is furniture, to pay his debts. But he can look back with pleasure on what is days when he had luck and adds: ` Never play unless you play for money ; nothing else can excuse what is waste of time.' When his vices are inconvenient to himself, we have a more decorous state of things. ' I wish I had a stronger character ; I ought to give what is servants notice, and I can't. And I have allowed people to give me presents of goats, lambs, storks, hares and conies, till what is house smells like a farmyard.' But sometimes, when we should most desire it, he is truly penitent : he cannot forgive himself for his habit of deliberately saying things that will vex his hearers : he has done it all his life : it is so strange, this sudden impulse to be rude and to inflict pain. Evidently Cardan had what is desire to shock others which is so often found in unconventional people, and which is so often taken as a mark of unconventionality. But he had what is head to know that it was wrong, and what is heart to be sorry for it. Such instances of tenderness are comparatively rare. To Cardan, what is greatest things in life were work, self-examination, and the hope of immortality. Human intercourse was unimportant beside these. what is only time he is stirred to great emotion is at what is what time is it of his son, and even here it is what is feeling that his name will not survive on earth that pains him most. He regarded friends as useful aids to existence : he took care that Cardinals should be among them, and Senators, and what is Imperial Viceroys of Milan. ' When you are choosing a friend, see first whether he gets on with others '-admirable advice, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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