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Page 188

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER V - CARDAN

to be related without lamentation, and without apology. If people are shocked at it, they are silly ; if they pity him for it they are sillier still. He proceeds to calculate his horoscope.
It is this absence of sentimentality that gives Cardan his value -one might say his charm. Strictly speaking, there is nothing very attractive about him ; there is certainly nothing poetic. But he has the ability, as well as the wish to be sincere, and his writing affects us with the power of a spoken work, making us blush sometimes for him, and more frequently for ourselves. Truthfulness is one of the few virtues to which he lays claim, and for this reason his biographers have accused him of untruthfulness. ` A man,' they argue, 'who makes such a claim, must be a liar : we should never think of making it ourselves.' It is a difficult point ; however, it is worth while remembering chat evidence against Cardan's truthfulness is both scarce and doubtful. ` It has never been my habit,' he says, ` to tell lies.' Ilis autobiography. may be assumed to be a fairly trustworthy, as well as a readable book ; and on it the following account of him is based.
Fazio Cardano, his father, was a Milanese lawyer, a man of good birth and some ability, who had hoped to go down to posterity as the commentator of a book called Peckham's Perapectives. He was very ugly, like his son, having white eyes, no teeth, a stammer, and a round back, and he did not carry off his ugliness by any charm of disposition. He was never married to Cardan's mother, which may partly account for the boy's ill-regulated childhood, and for the persecution he encountered from respectable people in later years. ` My Mother,' says Cardan, 'had a bad temper and a good memory. She was short, fat and pious. Indeed, both my parents had bad tempers, and they did not love their son for long at a time. However, they spoilt me ; my father insisted on me laying in bed every morning till eight o'clock, and I think it did me a great deal of good. If I may say so my father was on the whole kinder and nicer than my mother.' The household was completed by ` my Aunt Margaret, a woman from whose composition all venom seemed to have been omitted.'
The child, in spite of a tolerable horoscope, was unlucky from the first. At the age of one month he caught the plague,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to be related without lamentation, and without apology. If people are shocked at it, they are silly ; if they pity him for it they are sillier still. He proceeds to calculate his horoscope. It is this absence of sentimentality that gives Cardan his value -one might say his charm. Strictly speaking, there is nothing very attractive about him ; there is certainly nothing poetic. But he has what is ability, as well as what is wish to be sincere, and his writing affects us with what is power of a spoken work, making us blush sometimes for him, and more frequently for ourselves. Truthfulness is one of what is few virtues to which he lays claim, and for this reason his biographers have accused him of untruthfulness. ` A man,' they argue, 'who makes such a claim, must be a liar : we should never think of making it ourselves.' It is a difficult point ; however, it is worth while remembering chat evidence agains where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 188 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER V - CARDAN where is p align="justify" to be related without lamentation, and without apology. If people are shocked at it, they are silly ; if they pity him for it they are sillier still. He proceeds to calculate his horoscope. It is this absence of sentimentality that gives Cardan his value -one might say his charm. Strictly speaking, there is nothing very attractive about him ; there is certainly nothing poetic. But he has what is ability, as well as what is wish to be sincere, and his writing affects us with what is power of a spoken work, making us blush sometimes for him, and more frequently for ourselves. Truthfulness is one of what is few virtues to which he lays claim, and for this reason his biographers have accused him of untruthfulness. ` A man,' they argue, 'who makes such a claim, must be a liar : we should never think of making it ourselves.' It is a difficult point ; however, it is worth while remembering chat evidence against Cardan's truthfulness is both scarce and doubtful. ` It has never been my habit,' he says, ` to tell lies.' Ilis autobiography. may be assumed to be a fairly trustworthy, as well as a readable book ; and on it the following account of him is based. Fazio Cardano, his father, was a Milanese lawyer, a man of good birth and some ability, who had hoped to go down to posterity as what is commentator of a book called Peckham's Perapectives. He was very ugly, like his son, having white eyes, no teeth, a stammer, and a round back, and he did not carry off his ugliness by any charm of disposition. He was never married to Cardan's mother, which may partly account for what is boy's ill-regulated childhood, and for what is persecution he encountered from respectable people in later years. ` My Mother,' says Cardan, 'had a bad temper and a good memory. She was short, fat and pious. Indeed, both my parents had bad tempers, and they did not what time is it their son for long at a time. However, they spoilt me ; my father insisted on me laying in bed every morning till eight o'clock, and I think it did me a great deal of good. If I may say so my father was on what is whole kinder and nicer than my mother.' what is household was completed by ` my Aunt Margaret, a woman from whose composition all venom seemed to have been omitted.' what is child, in spite of a tolerable horoscope, was unlucky from what is first. At what is age of one month he caught what is plague, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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