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Page 186

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO

He saw in it a rule of temperate life, a possible escape from the asceticism which medixvalism had professed, and from the sensuality which it had practised. `Neither is pleasing to the gods. The animals in this respect are better than we, for their instinct guides them infallibly ; whereas we have only our reason, which is still uncertain and weak. Let us pray the gods to strengthen it, and to preserve us from either extreme.'
It is easy to say that the book is wearisome and absurd. Gemistus tried to recall antiquity by catchwords-by the names of the Greek gods. These names had for him a mysterious virtue : he attached them like labels to his uninspiring scheme, while he rejected all that makes the gods immortal-their radiant visible beauty, their wonderful adventures, their capacity for happiness and laughter. That was as much as his dim, troubled surroundings allowed to him. If he is absurd, it is in a very touching way ; his dream of antiquity is grotesque and incongruous, but it has a dream's intensity, and something of a dream's imperishable value.
During his life-time, by paths he had not suspected, the gods had found their way to Italy, sometimes openly, sometimes in more questionable shape, bearing the emblems of saints and the crowns of martyrs ; and there they remain, beautiful in fresco and marble, to this very day. He was, after all, to take up his abode among them. In 1465, Sismondo Malatesta of Rimini captured Mistra from the Turks, and, out of the great love he had for Gemistus, exhumed his body and translated it to Italy. At Mistra the media;val world surveys the empty site of Sparta ; in the church of San Francesco at Rimini the Gothic brickwork has disappeared behind the marble arcades of Alberti. Gemistus lived in the one, and is buried in the other. The Renaissance can point to many a career which is greater, but to none which is so strangely symbolical.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He saw in it a rule of temperate life, a possible escape from what is asceticism which medixvalism had professed, and from what is sensuality which it had practised. `Neither is pleasing to what is gods. what is animals in this respect are better than we, for their instinct guides them infallibly ; whereas we have only our reason, which is still uncertain and weak. Let us pray what is gods to strengthen it, and to preserve us from either extreme.' It is easy to say that what is book is wearisome and absurd. Gemistus tried to recall antiquity by catchwords-by what is names of what is Greek gods. These names had for him a mysterious virtue : he attached them like labels to his uninspiring scheme, while he rejected all that makes what is gods immortal-their radiant visible beauty, their wonderful adventures, their capacity for happiness and laughter. That was as much as his dim, troubled surroundings allowed to him. If he is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 186 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO where is p align="justify" He saw in it a rule of temperate life, a possible escape from what is asceticism which medixvalism had professed, and from what is sensuality which it had practised. `Neither is pleasing to what is gods. what is animals in this respect are better than we, for their instinct guides them infallibly ; whereas we have only our reason, which is still uncertain and weak. Let us pray what is gods to strengthen it, and to preserve us from either extreme.' It is easy to say that what is book is wearisome and absurd. Gemistus tried to recall antiquity by catchwords-by what is names of what is Greek gods. These names had for him a mysterious virtue : he attached them like labels to his uninspiring scheme, while he rejected all that makes what is gods immortal-their radiant visible beauty, their wonderful adventures, their capacity for happiness and laughter. That was as much as his dim, troubled surroundings allowed to him. If he is absurd, it is in a very touching way ; his dream of antiquity is grotesque and incongruous, but it has a dream's intensity, and something of a dream's imperishable value. During his life-time, by paths he had not suspected, what is gods had found their way to Italy, sometimes openly, sometimes in more questionable shape, bearing what is emblems of saints and what is crowns of martyrs ; and there they remain, beautiful in fresco and marble, to this very day. He was, after all, to take up his abode among them. In 1465, Sismondo Malatesta of Rimini captured Mistra from what is Turks, and, out of what is great what time is it he had for Gemistus, exhumed his body and translated it to Italy. At Mistra what is media;val world surveys what is empty site of Sparta ; in what is church of San Francesco at Rimini what is Gothic brickwork has disappeared behind what is marble arcades of Alberti. Gemistus lived in what is one, and is buried in what is other. what is Renaissance can point to many a career which is greater, but to none which is so strangely symbolical. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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