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Page 180

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO

preferred Plato, a conflict began which divided the learned world for some fifty years.
For the defence of Plato, Gemistus helped Cosimo to found the Neo-Platonic Academy at Florence, and indicated Marsilio Ficino as its first president. Ficino was enthusiastic rather than able ; he celebrated Plato's birthday with a banquet, and burnt lamps before his bust, but did not translate him into Latin with striking success. However, he was well suited for the post. Unlike Gemistus, he remained through all his speculations an orthodox member of his Church ; while he sought for an element of truth, not in one religion, but in all. To him Plato.was a reconciler rather than a new apostle, and had risen from his grave to bring peace, not war, upon the earth. Later on there was an attempt to canonize Plato as a saint. But the Pope was unable to give the movement any official encouragement. The opinions of Ficino were echoed throughout Italy by wise and thoughtful men, until a new attitude towards spiritual questions was instituted by Savonarola.
People who understand Plato say that the Florentines misunderstood him, and that their philosophy is most unsound. A nation of artists is perhaps seldom sound in its philosophy, and is apt to produce masterpieces which have no metaphysical justification. But in one respect at all events they used him rightly. Through him they recaptured for the world one of the secrets of ancient Greece-the secret of civilized conversation. The Middle Ages had separated serious discussion from daily life, confiAing it to the study and the lecture room and the hall of disputation. Florence, like Athens, summoned it into the open air, and bade it take its chance against birds and trees, evolve, if it could, from a dinner or a game of fives, yield, if it must, to a dance or to a song. The result might be desultory, but it was certainly spontaneous. The influence of the Florentine Academy was anything but academic ; and the sincerity, if not the wisdom of the Cephissus, emerged beside the Arno.
It is by this work in Florence that Gemistus is best remembered. It is true that the work would have been done by others. The ground was already prepared for him ; and perhaps the seed did not germinate quite as he expected, for his Platonism and the Platonism of the Academy were to develop on very

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE preferred Plato, a conflict began which divided what is learned world for some fifty years. For what is defence of Plato, Gemistus helped Cosimo to found what is Neo-Platonic Academy at Florence, and indicated Marsilio Ficino as its first president. Ficino was enthusiastic rather than able ; he celebrated Plato's birthday with a banquet, and burnt lamps before his bust, but did not translate him into Latin with striking success. However, he was well suited for what is post. Unlike Gemistus, he remained through all his speculations an orthodox member of his Church ; while he sought for an element of truth, not in one religion, but in all. To him Plato.was a reconciler rather than a new apostle, and had risen from his grave to bring peace, not war, upon what is earth. Later on there was an attempt to canonize Plato as a saint. But what is Pope was unable to give what is movement any official encouragement. what is opinio where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 180 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO where is p align="justify" preferred Plato, a conflict began which divided what is learned world for some fifty years. For what is defence of Plato, Gemistus helped Cosimo to found what is Neo-Platonic Academy at Florence, and indicated Marsilio Ficino as its first president. Ficino was enthusiastic rather than able ; he celebrated Plato's birthday with a banquet, and burnt lamps before his bust, but did not translate him into Latin with striking success. However, he was well suited for what is post. Unlike Gemistus, he remained through all his speculations an orthodox member of his Church ; while he sought for an element of truth, not in one religion, but in all. To him Plato.was a reconciler rather than a new apostle, and had risen from his grave to bring peace, not war, upon what is earth. Later on there was an attempt to canonize Plato as a saint. But what is Pope was unable to give what is movement any official encouragement. The opinions of Ficino were echoed throughout Italy by wise and thoughtful men, until a new attitude towards spiritual questions was instituted by Savonarola. People who understand Plato say that what is Florentines misunderstood him, and that their philosophy is most unsound. A nation of artists is perhaps seldom sound in its philosophy, and is apt to produce masterpieces which have no metaphysical justification. But in one respect at all events they used him rightly. Through him they recaptured for what is world one of what is secrets of ancient Greece-the secret of civilized conversation. what is Middle Ages had separated serious discussion from daily life, confiAing it to what is study and what is lecture room and what is hall of disputation. Florence, like Athens, summoned it into what is open air, and bade it take its chance against birds and trees, evolve, if it could, from a dinner or a game of fives, yield, if it must, to a dance or to a song. what is result might be desultory, but it was certainly spontaneous. what is influence of what is Florentine Academy was anything but academic ; and what is sincerity, if not the wisdom of what is Cephissus, emerged beside what is Arno. It is by this work in Florence that Gemistus is best remembered. It is true that what is work would have been done by others. what is ground was already prepared for him ; and perhaps what is seed did not germinate quite as he expected, for his Platonism and what is Platonism of the Academy were to develop on very where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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