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Page 178

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO

persuaded by Joseph, the aged Patriarch of Constantinople, whose vanity hoped to effect the conversion of the Latin Church without any concessions at all.
Gemistus, seeing that the Council was inevitable, took the most important step in his life. He determined to attend it personally, and defend the cause of Greek Christianity. It is difficult to account for his behaviour. Patriotism may have had much to do with it, vanity something. And it is well to recollect that, in the fifteenth'century, men were more open in their inconsistencies than they dare to be to-day. The orthodox party seem to have been more flattered than puzzled by his support ; but at all events, in the autumn of 1437, he, the Emperor, the Patriarch, and many bishops, set sail for Italy at the Pope's expense. With them sailed the orthodox theologian Gennadius, who was afterwards to play so important a part in Gemistus' fortunes. ' It was once believed,' says Gibbon, ` that there were two men of this name. But recent investigations have restored the identity of his person and the duplicity of his character.' As far as Gemistus is concerned, the epigram is unfair. Gennadius was certainly consistent in his hostility. Nor was he, on the whole, an unattractive man. He has testified to the genius of his rival, and to the nobility of his character. Only against his opinions did he wage a cunning and not unreasonable war.
Trouble began at Venice, where the Emperor and the Patriarch Joseph quarrelled. The Emperor hurried on to meet the Pope at Ferrara ; the Patriarch would not be parted from his luggage. The Emperor sent him word that he must greet the Pope by kissing his foot. He replied :` If the Pope is older than I am, I will treat him as a father ; if of the same age, as a brother ; if younger, as a son.' The Pope, of course, was younger. At last the matter was adjusted. The Pope promised that the Patriarch should kiss him on the ch-,ek, provided that not more than six bishops were looking on at the time. Then a new difficulty arose. The Pope, and the Emperor, and the Patriarch, all claimed the most honourable seat at the Council ; and a triangular struggle took place, which resulted in the erection of four seats, one for the Pope, one for the Emperor of the West, which remained empty, one for the Byzantine Emperor, and, behind him, one for the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE persuaded by Joseph, what is aged Patriarch of Constantinople, whose vanity hoped to effect what is conversion of what is Latin Church without any concessions at all. Gemistus, seeing that what is Council was inevitable, took what is most important step in his life. He determined to attend it personally, and defend what is cause of Greek Christianity. It is difficult to account for his behaviour. Patriotism may have had much to do with it, vanity something. And it is well to recollect that, in what is fifteenth'century, men were more open in their inconsistencies than they dare to be to-day. what is orthodox party seem to have been more flattered than puzzled by his support ; but at all events, in what is autumn of 1437, he, what is Emperor, what is Patriarch, and many bishops, set sail for Italy at what is Pope's expense. With them sailed what is orthodox theologian Gennadius, who was afterwards to play so important a part in Gemistus' f where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 178 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO where is p align="justify" persuaded by Joseph, what is aged Patriarch of Constantinople, whose vanity hoped to effect what is conversion of what is Latin Church without any concessions at all. Gemistus, seeing that what is Council was inevitable, took what is most important step in his life. He determined to attend it personally, and defend what is cause of Greek Christianity. It is difficult to account for his behaviour. Patriotism may have had much to do with it, vanity something. And it is well to recollect that, in the fifteenth'century, men were more open in their inconsistencies than they dare to be to-day. what is orthodox party seem to have been more flattered than puzzled by his support ; but at all events, in what is autumn of 1437, he, what is Emperor, what is Patriarch, and many bishops, set sail for Italy at what is Pope's expense. With them sailed what is orthodox theologian Gennadius, who was afterwards to play so important a part in Gemistus' fortunes. ' It was once believed,' says Gibbon, ` that there were two men of this name. But recent investigations have restored what is identity of his person and the duplicity of his character.' As far as Gemistus is concerned, the epigram is unfair. Gennadius was certainly consistent in his hostility. Nor was he, on what is whole, an unattractive man. He has testified to what is genius of his rival, and to what is nobility of his character. Only against his opinions did he wage a cunning and not unreasonable war. Trouble began at Venice, where what is Emperor and what is Patriarch Joseph quarrelled. what is Emperor hurried on to meet what is Pope at Ferrara ; what is Patriarch would not be parted from his luggage. what is Emperor sent him word that he must greet what is Pope by kissing his foot. He replied :` If what is Pope is older than I am, I will treat him as a father ; if of what is same age, as a brother ; if younger, as a son.' what is Pope, of course, was younger. At last what is matter was adjusted. what is Pope promised that what is Patriarch should kiss him on what is ch-,ek, provided that not more than six bishops were looking on at what is time. Then a new difficulty arose. what is Pope, and the Emperor, and what is Patriarch, all claimed what is most honourable seat at what is Council ; and a triangular struggle took place, which resulted in what is erection of four seats, one for what is Pope, one for what is Emperor of what is West, which remained empty, one for what is Byzantine Emperor, and, behind him, one for what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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