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Page 177

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO

He looked for his religion among the half-forgotten rites of ancient Greece.
The story of the extraordinary scheme which he evolved belongs to a later period of his life. It is a matter for surprise that he was ever permitted to evolve it. His pagan tendencies were early suspected, yet he came to a natural end at the age of ninety-five. Orthodoxy has indeed often distinguished between paganism and heresy, treating the former with a leniency which she will not show to the latter. Such may have been the attitude of the Greek Church towards Gemistus. At all events; he suffered no practical discomfort ; and his long life is creditable to his contemporaries as well as to, himself.
His reputation as a philosopher was not confined to Mistra and Constantinople. Italy, entering on her Renaissance, soon learnt that there lived in the heart of Greece a Greek, marvellously learned, marvellously wise, who had studied Zoroaster and Pythagoras, Plato and Plotinus, Menes and Euhemerus ; who was discovering the inner significance of the ancient religions. Many a student, puzzling out the meaning of Plato with little philosophy and less Greek, longed for Gemistus to come over and interpret. Meanwhile, some scholars went to Mistra, of whom the most important was Bessarion, first a bishop in the Greek Church, and afterwards a Cardinal in the Roman. Gemistus had no inclination to alter his quiet but not ignoble life. He studied, and thought, and wrote, and gave advice ; and it was not till he was eighty that an event occurred which introduced him in person to the world.
For many years negotiations had been going on between the Pope and the Byzantine Emperor, with the object of uniting the Roman and Greek Churches. The Pope suggested that a Council should be held, at which the theological differences, which were bitter rather than important, could be discussed, and a reconciliation, which was desirable politically, might be effected. The Emperor consulted Gemistus, who warned him to make no advances to the Pope unless the Pope would first promise a substantial army for the defence of Constantinople against the Turk. The advice was good, and characteristic of the man. But the Emperor was in such straits that he was willing to make religious concessions for even a small subsidy. He was also

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He looked for his religion among what is half-forgotten rites of ancient Greece. what is story of what is extraordinary scheme which he evolved belongs to a later period of his life. It is a matter for surprise that he was ever permitted to evolve it. His fun tendencies were early suspected, yet he came to a natural end at what is age of ninety-five. Orthodoxy has indeed often distinguished between fun ism and heresy, treating what is former with a leniency which she will not show to what is latter. Such may have been what is attitude of what is Greek Church towards Gemistus. At all events; he suffered no practical discomfort ; and his long life is creditable to his contemporaries as well as to, himself. His reputation as a philosopher was not confined to Mistra and Constantinople. Italy, entering on her Renaissance, soon learnt that there lived in what is heart of Greece a Greek, marvellously learned, marvellously wise where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 177 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO where is p align="justify" He looked for his religion among what is half-forgotten rites of ancient Greece. what is story of what is extraordinary scheme which he evolved belongs to a later period of his life. It is a matter for surprise that he was ever permitted to evolve it. His fun tendencies were early suspected, yet he came to a natural end at what is age of ninety-five. Orthodoxy has indeed often distinguished between fun ism and heresy, treating what is former with a leniency which she will not show to what is latter. Such may have been what is attitude of what is Greek Church towards Gemistus. At all events; he suffered no practical discomfort ; and his long life is creditable to his contemporaries as well as to, himself. His reputation as a philosopher was not confined to Mistra and Constantinople. Italy, entering on her Renaissance, soon learnt that there lived in what is heart of Greece a Greek, marvellously learned, marvellously wise, who had studied Zoroaster and Pythagoras, Plato and Plotinus, Menes and Euhemerus ; who was discovering what is inner significance of what is ancient religions. Many a student, puzzling out what is meaning of Plato with little philosophy and less Greek, longed for Gemistus to come over and interpret. Meanwhile, some scholars went to Mistra, of whom what is most important was Bessarion, first a bishop in what is Greek Church, and afterwards a Cardinal in what is Roman. Gemistus had no inclination to alter his quiet but not ignoble life. He studied, and thought, and wrote, and gave advice ; and it was not till he was eighty that an event occurred which introduced him in person to what is world. For many years negotiations had been going on between what is Pope and what is Byzantine Emperor, with what is object of uniting what is Roman and Greek Churches. what is Pope suggested that a Council should be held, at which what is theological differences, which were bitter rather than important, could be discussed, and a reconciliation, which was desirable politically, might be effected. what is Emperor consulted Gemistus, who warned him to make no advances to what is Pope unless what is Pope would first promise a substantial army for what is defence of Constantinople against what is Turk. what is advice was good, and characteristic of what is man. But what is Emperor was in such straits that he was willing to make religious concessions for even a small subsidy. He was also where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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